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'I saw hate in his eyes': White security guard pulls gun on black police officer

'I saw hate in his eyes': White security guard pulls gun on black police officer Sheriff's deputy Alan Gaston thought they were on the same side.One man, Mr Gaston, was a high-ranking officer in the Lucas County, Ohio, sheriff's department with 34 years of experience.The other was a security guard contracted to protect an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) office in Toledo.But then the guard pulled his gun. He raised his voice. He put a hand on Mr Gaston's arm and rested his finger on the trigger.In a matter of seconds, what began with a routine errand at the IRS escalated into a frightening standoff between a white security guard and a black police officer, who said he heard hate in the guard's shouts and believed he would be shot."You don't expect to be ambushed by someone who you think is on the same team," Mr Gaston told The Washington Post."I feel there was definitely some racial overtones involved. And I'm not the type of person to throw the race card, I'm just telling you the facts. I looked in his eyes and I saw hate in his eyes."He had stopped by the IRS office during his shift on 31 May to ask a question about a letter the agency sent him.He was in full uniform, his badge and his firearm in clear view.The security guard, identified in court documents as Seth Eklund, asked Mr Gaston to leave his gun in his patrol car.When Mr Gaston replied he couldn't do that, he said Mr Eklund became hostile. Mr Eklund accused Mr Gaston of reaching for his weapon, shouting "get your hands off your gun", even though Mr Gaston said his hands were visible and nowhere near his holster.Mr Gaston, who has years of experience teaching defensive tactics, decided it was time for him to leave.He recalled a wide-eyed elderly couple in the office waiting room watching the exchange, and he said he feared for the bystanders' safety. Mr Gaston turned to go.As he walked out of the cramped office, Mr Eklund drew his gun, trained it on Mr Gaston's back and followed him. At one point, Mr Gaston said, Mr Eklund tried to arrest the uniformed officer."He came around the corner with his weapon out, telling me, 'you had your chance, you're not going anywhere, I'm detaining you'," Gaston said."That's when I was preparing myself to be shot. The hate and anger he had against me, I was getting ready to be shot by this security guard for no reason."Mr Eklund, who could not be reached for comment, pleaded not guilty to one charge of aggravated menacing in a court appearance on Monday.Mr Gaston and his wife have also filed a lawsuit against Mr Eklund and the two security firms that apparently employed him.Representatives of those companies, Paragon Systems and Praetorian Shield, did not respond to requests for comment. The IRS declined to comment.The local news station WTVG published what it claims to be security camera footage of the interaction and The Washington Post obtained screenshots of the video.The images show Mr Gaston backing away and attempting to leave the building in an elevator. But Mr Eklund, gun still drawn, blocks the door with his foot.Mr Gaston says he felt cornered, scared. He took out his phone to take a picture of Mr Eklund, he said, and the security guard finally holstered his weapon.Heather Taylor, president of the Ethical Society of Police in St Louis, said that Mr Eklund behaved recklessly and likely would not have treated a white officer the same way."We know what it's like being an African American police officer in a city," Ms Taylor said. "A lot of us realise that, hey, even though you're in uniform, that doesn't mean you're safe."The tense scene recalled other, infamous incidents with grisly endings. Ms Taylor pointed to the case of Jemel Roberson, a black security guard who was killed by a Midlothian, Illinois, police officer while they both responded to a shooting at the bar where Roberson worked.She also mentioned Detective Jacai Colson in Maryland, who was killed by a fellow officer while working undercover. Mr Colson, according to a lawsuit, had his badge in his hand and was shouting "Police! Police!" before he was killed."You're not given the benefit of the doubt as a minority," Ms Taylor said. "It's something we've been highlighting forever and now here's another example of it."She applauded Mr Gaston's cool demeanour in the face of what she said was potentially lethal bigotry.Mr Gaston said he didn't feel that Mr Eklund respected him as a law enforcement officer, and in more than three decades of police work has never dealt with anything like that.He was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and severe depression, he said. He's been on medical leave and is seeing a counsellor twice a week. The civil suit Mr Gaston and his wife filed seeks compensation.The standoff between Mr Gaston and Mr Eklund ended, he said, when Toledo police officers responded to a 911 call from inside the building that mentioned a man who has "got a gun" and "won't leave". The caller didn't mention that the man was a police officer.When Toledo police arrived, Mr Gaston recounted, they told Mr Eklund: "You know he's a uniformed deputy sheriff, right? We can go anywhere in this building we want."Washington Post

Iran says it came to help of disabled foreign oil tanker in the Gulf

Iran says it came to help of disabled foreign oil tanker in the Gulf Iranian navy vessels came to the assistance of a disabled foreign oil tanker in the Gulf that needed repairs, Iran's foreign ministry spokesman was quoted as saying on Tuesday by the semi-official news agency ISNA. "(Spokesman) Abbas Mousavi said... that an international oil tanker was in trouble due to a technical fault in the Persian Gulf... After receiving a request for assistance, Iranian forces approached it and used a tugboat to pull it towards Iranian waters for the necessary repairs to be carried out," ISNA said. A CNN reporter tweeted earlier that U.S. intelligence increasingly believed that the UAE tanker MT Riah had been forced into Iranian waters by Iran's Revolutionary Guards naval forces.

European sites where US nuclear weapons held inadvertently revealed in Nato-linked document

European sites where US nuclear weapons held inadvertently revealed in Nato-linked document The European sites where America's nuclear weapons are stored has been inadvertently revealed in a document published by a Nato-linked body, according to Belgian media reports.  The document written by for the Defense and Security Committee of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly made passing reference to the roughly 150 US nuclear weapons being stored in Europe. "These bombs are stored at six US and European bases - Kleine Brogel in Belgium, Büchel in Germany, Aviano and Ghedi-Torre in Italy, Volkel in The Netherlands, and Incirlik in Turkey," one line read, according to the Belgian newspaper De Morgen.  The reference was reportedly contained in the original version of the document which was published in April but has since been removed in a final version which went out last week. The document, titled "A new era for nuclear deterrence? Modernisation, arms control and allied nuclear forces," was written by a Canadian senator.  A Nato official told The Washington Post the document was not from Nato itself - it was published by the group's parliamentary assembly and added: "We do not comment on the details of Nato's nuclear posture." The presence of US nuclear weapons in Europe acted as a deterrent to the Soviet Union during the Cold War and also meant European countries would not need to develop their own versions. However for years the exact locations of the weapons have been a secret - though experts said their presence was widely known in the international community.  The faux pas was picked up by the European press. Dutch broadcaster RTL News ran an article headlined: "Nato reveals the Netherlands's worst-kept secret."  The reporting from De Morgen read: "Finally in black and white: There are American nuclear weapons in Belgium."

Serial killer linked to Arkansas woman's 1994 slaying

Serial killer linked to Arkansas woman's 1994 slaying Authorities are investigating whether possibly the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history is behind the death of an Arkansas woman in 1994. Police in Pine Bluff are reviewing the case of Jolanda Jones's death after Samuel Little confessed to her killing, which had been determined to be drug-related. According to a police memo, when Little was in custody in Dallas, Texas, in October 2018, he indicated that he killed Jones, the Pine Bluff Commercial reported .

An Air Force Pilot Tells Us What Flying a B-2 Stealth Bomber Is Like

An Air Force Pilot Tells Us What Flying a B-2 Stealth Bomber Is Like (Washington, D.C.) When B-2 stealth bombers attacked Serbia on the opening night of Operation Allied Force in 1999, destroyed Iraqi air defenses during 2003's "Shock and Awe" and eliminated the Libyan fighter force in 2011 -- the attacks were all guided by highly-specialized pilots trained in stealth attack tactics.Given the dangers of these kinds of missions, such as flying into heavy enemy ground fire from air defenses, confronting the prospect of air attacks and preparing for electronic warfare over hostile territory, B-2 pilots need to be ready."We prepare and train every single day in case we get called up tomorrow," Lt. Col. Nicola Polidor, Commander of Detachment 5 of the 29th Training Systems Squadron, told Warrior in an interview.While performing missions, B-2 pilots need to maintain the correct flight path, align with specific targeting intelligence and load and prepare weapons, all while manning a digital cockpit to control a wide range of additional variables at one time. Polidor, who trains future B-2 pilots at Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri, says Air Force pilot trainees have adjusted well to learning a seemingly overwhelming amount of new information."The biggest challenge for pilots is being able to manage flying for long periods of time at the same time as managing a communications suite and robust weapons package," Polidor said.Polidor is only the 10th female B-2 pilot in history.Training is broken down into an academic phase and a flight phase, with classroom training as the first step. Trainees, Polidor explained, typically spend about two months working on a simulator, before taking their first flight.

A 3-year-old girl was asked to choose between her mom or dad as a border patrol agent tried to separate the family

A 3-year-old girl was asked to choose between her mom or dad as a border patrol agent tried to separate the family A young girl named Sofi was asked by a Border Patrol agent if she wanted to go with her mom, or her dad, as they tried to separate the migrant family.

India-Pakistan spy case ruling due at world court

India-Pakistan spy case ruling due at world court The International Court of Justice will decide Wednesday on India's bid to remove an alleged spy from death row in Pakistan, in a case that has stoked tensions between the South Asian rivals. Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav, a former Indian navy officer, was arrested in Pakistan's restive southwestern province of Baluchistan in March 2016 on charges of espionage. The 48-year-old was then sentenced to death by a Pakistani military court in 2017, sparking outrage in India.

The world's 5th-largest airline blames the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max as it says it expects to carry fewer passengers and may even close some of its airport bases

The world's 5th-largest airline blames the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max as it says it expects to carry fewer passengers and may even close some of its airport bases Ryanair's CEO said the company was confident in the Boeing 737 Max but it would be "prudent" to think the plane might not return until December.

Anti-Semitism event at Justice Department turns into pro-Israel rally

Anti-Semitism event at Justice Department turns into pro-Israel rally As the public grappled with President Trump's latest insulting tweetstorm, widely condemned as racist, the Department of Justice held a Monday event billed as a summit on combating anti-Semitism.

Michael Flynn's Ex-Business Partner Points the Finger at Him in Court

Michael Flynn's Ex-Business Partner Points the Finger at Him in Court Photo Illustration by Lyne Lucien/The Daily Beast/GettyIf there is a question of who worked on behalf of the Turkish government to influence the 2016 Donald Trump campaign, then the court should look no further than former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, lawyers for Bijan Kian, the Iranian-American businessman and former Flynn partner, told jurors in the Eastern District of Virginia Monday. Kian is charged with two felonies-illegally lobbying on behalf of the Turkish government and conspiring covertly to influence U.S. politics about Fethullah Gulen, a Turkish cleric who is now living in Pennsylvania. He faces a maximum of 15 years in prison if convicted. But Kian's team of attorneys said in their opening statements Monday that their client "did not conspire with anyone" to work on behalf of the Turkish government in the U.S. When questioning the Turkish government's influence operations in the U.S., the jury should look at the newly announced cache of evidence the government has on Flynn, said attorney Bob Trout. Kian isn't referenced in any of it, Trout said. Michael Flynn Putting Mueller Deal at Risk in 'Dangerous' New TrialIn the opening statements Monday the Kian legal team spent the majority of their time arguing that their client did not work on behalf of the Turkish government when he attempted to influence public opinion in the U.S. about Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen. Gulen currently lives in Pennsylvania and is wanted by the Turkish government for allegedly planning a military coup in the country in 2016. Kian instead worked on behalf of a Turkish-Dutch businessman named Ekim Alptekin, Trout said. (Alptekin is named as a defendant in the Kian case but will likely avoid appearance because he is living in Istanbul.) Toward the end of his statements, Trout tried to create a degree of separation between Kian and Flynn who is currently awaiting sentencing in Washington for crimes carried out during his time working with the Trump team. He pointed to the government's evidence, which was mentioned in a hearing last week, and said that prosecutors had all but conceded that Kian was not involved. The jurors have not seen the evidence yet and the details of what the government currently has in its position is unclear.According to a government indictment filed last year, Flynn and Kian worked together throughout the fall of 2016, when Flynn was an advisor to then candidate Trump, on a project to try and extradite Gulen back to Turkey. Prosecutors said the two took hundreds of thousands of dollars from the Turkish government to execute the plan. Flynn was also at the time accused of lying about his communications with Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak. He entered into a cooperation deal with Special Counsel Robert Mueller and admitted to lying about the communications and about his consulting firm's business with the Turkish government. He said that the registration he filed for the Turkey-focused project in 2017 contained several inaccuracies, though his lawyers maintain that Flynn did not intentionally lie on the documents. As part of his deal with the government, Flynn was supposed to testify against Kian and his sentencing in Washington was postponed so he could appear as a witness in Virginia.That all changed last week when the government removed Flynn from the witness list and instead named him as a co-conspirator in the case. The government also said it had extensive information that the Turkish government attempted to influence the Trump campaign through Flynn. It was the first mention of an additional set of materials that show how Flynn was being extensively involved in the Turkish lobbying.It's that evidence that lies at the heart of who really committed the crime of illegally lobbying for Turkey, Kian's lawyers said Monday. Kian "didn't know" about the alleged separate communications between Alptekin and Flynn that are in the government's possession, Trout said.For its part, the government in its opening statement barely mentioned the former national security adviser, instead referring several times to Kian's business team members as "associates." The government focused on Kian's email correspondences, including with Flynn, about the Gulen project and attempted to lay out for the jury how the money that flowed into Kian's account for services rendered connected back to the Turkish government.After nearly an hour and a half of opening statements, both of which were at times tangled and difficult to follow, the jury seemed to fade by 5:30 p.m. Several individuals closed their eyes and appeared to be sleeping.They're due back in court Tuesday morning for testimony, including evidence to be entered into the record and for witness examinations.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

UPDATE 1-Iran says it came to help of disabled foreign oil tanker in the Gulf

UPDATE 1-Iran says it came to help of disabled foreign oil tanker in the Gulf Iranian navy vessels came to the assistance of a disabled foreign oil tanker in the Gulf that needed repairs, Iran's foreign ministry spokesman was quoted as saying on Tuesday by the semi-official news agency ISNA. "(Spokesman) Abbas Mousavi said... that an international oil tanker was in trouble due to a technical fault in the Persian Gulf... After receiving a request for assistance, Iranian forces approached it and used a tugboat to pull it towards Iranian waters for the necessary repairs to be carried out," ISNA said. A CNN reporter tweeted earlier that U.S. intelligence increasingly believed that the UAE tanker MT Riah had been forced into Iranian waters by Iran's Revolutionary Guards naval forces.

Investigators 'discover mysterious 200lb load' on board MH370 after take-off

Investigators 'discover mysterious 200lb load' on board MH370 after take-off Investigators looking into the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have discovered a "mysterious 200lb load" added to the flight list after take-off, according to an engineer whose wife and two children were on board. Ghyslain Wattrelos said the cargo was revealed in a report on the passengers and baggage by French investigators. Mr Wattrelos, who believes the flight was deliberately downed, told Le Parisien newspaper: "It was also learned that a mysterious load of 89 kilos was added to the flight list after take-off. A container was also overloaded, without anyone knowing why. It may be incompetence or manipulation. Everything is possible. This will be part of the questions for the Malaysians." MH370 became one of the world's greatest aviation mysteries when it vanished with 239 people on board en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8, 2014. French investigators who examined flight data at Boeing's headquarters in Seattle believe that the pilot was in control of the airliner "right up to the end".  A modern mystery | Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Mr Wattrelos said the investigators told him the data "lends weight" to the theory that the pilot crashed into the sea in a murder-suicide, although they stressed that there was no proof. The investigators expect it to take up to a year to examine the data fully. However, some experts believe a hijack by a stowaway is a possibility and the mysterious load could lend credence to the theory. Tim Termini, an aviation security specialist, told Channel 5 earlier this month: "It's highly likely that a hijack took place and again, there's four options for the hijack. "One is the hijack of the aircraft through a crew member. The second is a hijack coming from a passenger. A third option, which is a fairly unusual one, would be a stowaway. And then of course the fourth option is an electrical takeover of the aircraft from a ground-based station." Mr Wattrelos, 54, who has led a campaign to find out what happened to the flight, acknowledged that "there is a risk that I may never learn the full truth." Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily Front Page newsletter and new audio briefings.

Bianca Devins murder: Photos of teenage girl's body posted on Instagram by boyfriend, police say

Bianca Devins murder: Photos of teenage girl's body posted on Instagram by boyfriend, police say A US teenager with a growing social media following was killed by a man she had recently met on Instagram who then posted photos of her dead body online, police have said.Bianca Devins, from Utica in upstate New York was allegedly stabbed to death by Brandon Clark, 21, who is being held on a second-degree murder charge.Police said the pair met on Instagram around two months ago, before their "relationship progressed into a personally intimate one".They had met each other's families and went to a concert together in New York City on Saturday night.After they got into an argument on the drive back to Utica, Mr Clark used a large knife to kill the 17-year-old, police said.Mr Clark allegedly posted gory pictures of the murder on his Instagram account, alongside a message reading: "I'm sorry Bianca."The photos were redistributed widely on online chat sites including 4chan and Discord, where some users made light of the teen's death while others urged people to stop sharing the images.Authorities began receiving calls about the photos around 7.20am on Sunday and were trying to find the teen when Mr Clark called 911 to report what he had done, Utica's public safety department said in a statement.Officers who tracked the call found Mr Clark stabbing himself in the neck.He then laid down on a green tarp under which Ms Devins' body was found and took selfies before officers took him into custody, police said.The case is being investigated as a murder and attempted suicide, Utica police Lieutenant Bryan Coromato said.Ms Devins' family said in a statement the teen was "a talented artist" and "a wonderful young girl, taken from us all too soon"."Bianca's smile brightened our lives," the family wrote. "She will always be remembered as our Princess."Utica police said they are working to address the sharing of the images with various social media platforms.A spokesperson for Instagram said: "Our thoughts go out to those affected by this tragic event. We are taking every measure to remove this content from our platforms."Our goal is to take action as soon as possible - there is always room for improvement. We don't want people seeing content that violates our policies."

O'Rourke's fundraising woes revive concerns about campaign

O'Rourke's fundraising woes revive concerns about campaign Beto O'Rourke stormed into the presidential race arguing his experience growing up along the southern border and a relatively moderate approach to politics would distinguish him in a crowded field. Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has become a top-tier White House hopeful with an earnest, intellectual and largely moderate appeal. The other Texan in the race, former Obama housing secretary Julián Castro, has overshadowed O'Rourke on immigration issues, scolding him during last month's debate for not being willing to fully decriminalize crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally.

Geraldo Rivera on Trump's controversial tweets: It pains me to watch Trump take the low road

Geraldo Rivera on Trump's controversial tweets: It pains me to watch Trump take the low road Trump embroiled in feud with progressive Democrats following tweet about congresswomen of color; reaction from Fox News correspondent-at-large Geraldo Rivera and Fox News contributor David Webb.

Australia calls on China to let Uighur mother and son leave

Australia calls on China to let Uighur mother and son leave Australia's government on Wednesday called on China to allow an Australian child and his Uighur mother to leave the country, days after co-signing a letter denouncing Beijing's treatment of the Muslim minority. China has rounded up an estimated one million Uighurs and other mostly Muslim Turkic-speaking minorities into re-education camps in tightly controlled Xinjiang region, in the country's northwest. Sadam Abdusalam has campaigned for months for his Uighur wife, Nadila Wumaier, and their son Lutifeier, whom he has never met, to be allowed to come to Australia.

View Photos of the Lotus Evija

View Photos of the Lotus Evija

GOP advisers reportedly told Trump his racist attacks on Democratic congresswomen may have backfired

GOP advisers reportedly told Trump his racist attacks on Democratic congresswomen may have backfired GOP advisers think President Donald Trump's tweets helped bring together a Democratic Party that last week was split by infighting, Politico said.

Afghanistan Isn't Worth Dying For

Afghanistan Isn't Worth Dying For Army Sgt. Maj. James Sartor was killed in action in Afghanistan's Faryab Province on Saturday. He was "only" the twelfth soldier to die there this year. That makes his death no less inexcusable, no less an unacceptable sacrifice for Washington's failed foreign policy.What do we tell Sartor's family? That he heroically "gave the last full measure" for the defense of our nation? In some conflicts in American history, that might have been true. But in Afghanistan, it is a trite and insulting bromide.This man, like the eleven that preceded him this year, sacrificed his life in an operation that provided no benefit to our country. America is not safer because of this supreme, excruciatingly painful sacrifice. The truth is that hardly any Americans pay any attention to our war in Afghanistan and fewer still genuinely care that another trooper has tragically been killed.Instead, the entire burden of the grief-the unquenchable, searing pain of loss-falls to a tiny number of family members and close friends of those who died. My blood boils in anger when I hear-as I have many times-some callously claim, "Hey man, nobody forced them to sign up. They volunteered and knew what they were getting themselves into." This implies that we service members forfeit the value of our life once we raise our right hand.

Iran Says Missing Tanker Had Problems and Was Towed for Repairs

Iran Says Missing Tanker Had Problems and Was Towed for Repairs (Bloomberg) -- A small oil tanker that had gone missing in the Persian Gulf had technical difficulties and was towed into Iranian waters for repairs, an Iranian foreign ministry official said, according to the ISNA news agency.Further details on the ship, the Panamanian-flagged Riah, will be announced later, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said, according to the semi-offficial ISNA. Iran responded after a request for assistance from the tanker, the report said.The Iranian comments did little to clarify exactly what happened to the Riah. The vessel was passing through the Strait of Hormuz, the shipping chokepoint at the mouth of the Gulf, before it went silent more than two days ago in unexplained circumstances, according to the Associated Press. The news agency said the U.S. "has suspicions" that Iran took control of the tanker, citing an unidentified defense official.The disappearance was first reported by CNN, which said U.S. intelligence increasingly believed the tanker had been forced into Iranian waters by Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps but that some Gulf sources suggested the ship simply broke down and was towed by Iran.Earlier, a United Arab Emirates official said the ship isn't owned or operated by the U.A.E. and hadn't sent out a distress call.While details are unclear, if the Riah was seized, it would seem an unusual target for Iran. The vessel is 30 years old and tiny. Its capacity is 2,000 dead weight tons, according to the MarineTraffic website. That's only a fraction of the almost 160,000-ton capacity of the British Heritage, the U.K. oil tanker harassed by Iranian ships last week while exiting the Persian Gulf.Why Tanker Attacks Raise Fears Over Strait of Hormuz: QuickTakeWhile Iran has been blamed for attacks on merchant shipping in recent months, it has denied responsibility. The main threats it has made in the past few weeks have been against the U.K. after British Royal Marines helped authorities in Gibraltar seize the supertanker as it carried Iranian crude in the Mediterranean Sea seemingly bound for Syria.In May and June, six tankers were attacked just outside the Gulf. A British Navy frigate intervened this month to stop Iranian boats from blocking the BP Plc-operated British Heritage as it was exiting the waters.U.K. Navy Intervenes After Iran Tries to Stop British Oil TankerThe U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet, which is based in Bahrain, declined to comment when contacted by Bloomberg.\--With assistance from Anthony DiPaola and Golnar Motevalli.To contact the reporters on this story: Zainab Fattah in Dubai at zfattah@bloomberg.net;Verity Ratcliffe in Dubai at vratcliffe1@bloomberg.net;Zoya Khan in New York at zkhan79@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Bill Faries, Larry LiebertFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

Prehistoric city offers glimpse of ancient living near Jerusalem

Prehistoric city offers glimpse of ancient living near Jerusalem The 9,000-year-old metropolis, uncovered during a survey before the construction of a new highway, is one of the biggest ever found, the Israel Antiquities Authority said on Tuesday. It covered dozens of acres near what is today the town of Motza, some five km (three miles) west of Jerusalem. "This is most probably the largest excavation of this time period in the Middle East, which will allow the research to advance leaps and bounds ahead of where we are today, just by the amount of material that we are able to save and preserve from this site," Lauren Davis, an archaeologist with Israel's antiquities authority, told Reuters.

Air Force Major Charged With Murder After Missing Wife's Remains Found

Air Force Major Charged With Murder After Missing Wife's Remains Found Bexar County Sheriff's OfficeA San Antonio Air Force Reserve major who reported his wife missing in March has been arrested and charged with murder, authorities said. Andre McDonald, 40, was charged with first-degree murder Sunday in the death of his wife, 29-year-old Andreen McDonald, on March 1. After three months of countless countywide searches, authorities found the businesswoman's body on a ranch east of Joint Base San Antonio-Camp Bullis.McDonald is being held at Bexar County Jail on a $2 million bond, police confirmed to The Daily Beast. "Any ounce of understanding that we had for Andy is gone," her cousin, Cheryl Spencer, told KSAT during a Sunday vigil. "You do not have the right to do this to any human being. Andreen was far from perfect. She had her flaws, but you do not have the right to do this to anybody's child."Did Missing Texas Woman Andreen McDonald's 6-Year-Old Autistic Daughter Witness Her Murder?While many details of the March murder remain unknown, authorities believe the couple's 7-year-old daughter, who is autistic and nonverbal, may have seen the crime and subsequent cleanup. "At this point, I don't know how much the little girl knows," Bexar County Sheriff Javier Salazar said during a press conference Saturday. "I'm still of the belief that the little girl witnessed at least some things with the death of her mom."Authorities say Andreen McDonald, the owner of Starlight Homes Assisted Living, was last seen with her daughter around 6:20 p.m. on February 28. According to an arrest warrant obtained by The Daily Beast, phone records indicate both McDonald and his wife were home the entire evening.The next day, deputies went to the couple's home to conduct a welfare check after the 29-year-old's mother and several friends said they had not heard from her since the previous evening. According to the arrest warrant, two of Andreen McDonald's friends told authorities that before her disappearance she had said that "if she ever went missing or was found dead, Andre had killed her." A Bexar County Sheriff spokesperson confirmed officers had been called to their home "numerous times" for domestic disturbances. According to public records, McDonald filed for divorce in February 2017 but later dismissed the petition. In their backyard, deputies "noticed a burn pile," where "it appeared something had recently been burned." All of Andreen McDonald's personal belongings were still in the house and her car was parked in the driveway.Cops: NYPD Officer Ordered Hit on Estranged Husband, Boyfriend's KidWhen McDonald arrived home, he told deputies his wife was being treated at a local hospital. Police quickly suspected he was lying.He "claimed he did not know where Andreen McDonald was," the warrant states, but "revealed he had an argument with his wife the night before and asked for an attorney."Authorities also found blood and hair on the bathroom's light switch, floor, and door handle-though initial DNA tests could not determine if the samples belonged to Andreen McDonald.Andre McDonald was first charged on March 3 with tampering with evidence after investigators discovered that he had purchased cans of gasoline, heavy duty trash bags, work gloves, a portable burn barrel, a shovel, and an ax around the time he reported his wife missing. The Air Force officer then tried to destroy the receipt and throw them away in the kitchen trash can, authorities allege."He went to great lengths to destroy that receipt. We were able to recover it but that's what led to the tampering with evidence charge," Salazar said. "So, I think a lot of his behavior up to this point, along with some of the evidence that I won't go too much into detail on, are what led to this charge."According to the arrest warrant, McDonald had "cuts and injuries" on his hands when he was arrested and gave conflicting accounts about how the wounds occurred.Inside another trash can, the warrant states, investigators found a blood-stained hammer and a man's sweater and jeans, which had the couple's blood on it. The daughter, who has not been publicly named, suggested to one family friend that her mother had been burned, according to court documents, and made comments about "Andre hurting Mommy." In one attempt to explain what she saw, the daughter took a doll, put it in a circle over rocks, and covered it with sticks before asking for "the fire." Wife Kills Husband, Admits It in a Bar BathroomSince his initial arrest, McDonald "has not once asked" about the ongoing search for his wife and has never tried to assist in the investigation, the warrant said. On July 11, a friend of the ranch's owner discovered Andreen McDonald's body while removing two cow skulls on the 50-acre property. According to the warrant, when authorities arrived they "noticed the human remains appeared to have been covered with wood and bones from a nearby deceased cow and set on fire." Melted plastic or synthetic material was also found among the remains. The Medical Examiner's Office confirmed the remains belonged to Andreen McDonald on Friday night using her dental records. The next day, McDonald was arrested at home and appeared "quiet" and "fully cooperative," Salazar said on Saturday."I actually enjoyed him being arrested," Andreen McDonald's cousin Cheryl Spencer said. "That was nice. I like that little public shaming."A Bexar County Sheriff spokesperson declined to provide a motive on Monday, but added that there is "substantial" evidence to prove McDonald killed his wife and disposed of her body. "The next step is to prepare this case to go to trial with the DA's office," the spokesperson said. "Our department is dedicated to getting justice for Andreen and her family."McDonald's attorney, John Convery, declined The Daily Beast's request for comment. Andreen McDonald's immediate family did not respond to multiple attempts for comment. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

ICE raids: Top immigration official admits he 'does not know details' of controversial arrests

ICE raids: Top immigration official admits he 'does not know details' of controversial arrests The acting director of US Citizenship and Immigration Services has said he does not have details about the ICE raids targeting undocumented immigrants, even though he has spoken about the operation in recent days.Ken Cuccinelli said during a CNN appearance on Monday he did "not have operational details", including how many arrests were made during the operation that began on Sunday.Last week, Mr Cuccinelli discussed the operation and said there were approximately one million people in the US with removal orders."I told you, I don't have details about any arrests that have taken place so far with respect to that operation," Mr Cuccinelli said, explaining his lack of knowledge about specifics by saying "operational details are kept contained within the agency".The raids were expected in Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Francisco.But, there were no reports of the raids in several cities, according to immigrant advocacy groups that are monitoring the situation.Mr Cucinelli's agency is in charge of legal immigration, and it is left to Immigration and Customs Enforcement to detain undocumented immigrants for deportation.The US has conducted raids previously, including raids on workplaces where undocumented immigrants have allegedly been hired.Donald Trump's administration has overseen a spike in the number of those kinds of raids, compared to during the Obama administration.

At least 1 dead, 15 injured - including 3 firefighters - in California house explosion

At least 1 dead, 15 injured - including 3 firefighters - in California house explosion A California gas company reports one of its employees died in an explosion Monday afternoon in Murietta, California.

'The Five' respond to progressive Democrats' news conference on Trump's tweets

'The Five' respond to progressive Democrats' news conference on Trump's tweets Reps. Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib take aim at President Trump in a fiery news conference on Capitol Hill.

Trump administration blasts WTO ruling on China

Trump administration blasts WTO ruling on China

Rep. Al Green to force impeachment vote against Trump

Rep. Al Green to force impeachment vote against Trump Green previously forced two votes on impeachment articles in 2017 and 2018.

Prosecco Grapes, Kiwi Pops, and More Easy Fruit Desserts

Prosecco Grapes, Kiwi Pops, and More Easy Fruit Desserts

Odd Man Out: How the Independent Justin Amash Could Shake Up the 2020 Presidential Election

Odd Man Out: How the Independent Justin Amash Could Shake Up the 2020 Presidential Election Washington circles are abuzz with the suggestion that Justin Amash, the ex-Republican congressman from Michigan, may mount a third-party presidential campaign in 2020. In the few days since leaving the GOP, he's talked about "room for a third party" and refused to rule out running for president. But sources close to Amash and the Libertarian Party deny that a presidential run is in the works-although the door is still open. For the time being, the Libertarian-leaning representative is looking to build a fiscally conservative, pro-restraint coalition across party lines.Michigan representative Justin Amash has made waves in recent weeks with his challenges to the Republican establishment. He first suggested that President Donald Trump should be impeached, then he contested the president's authority to attack Iran without congressional approval, and finally left the party.Amash seemed to send mixed signals about his next move, telling CNN that he's planning to run for re-election to the House of Representatives, but confirming that he still "wouldn't rule anything like [a Libertarian presidential run] out."

Susan Rice Calls Chinese Diplomat a 'Racist Disgrace' on Twitter

Susan Rice Calls Chinese Diplomat a 'Racist Disgrace' on Twitter (Bloomberg) -- Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.Former U.S. National Security Advisor Susan Rice sparred with a senior Chinese diplomat on Twitter in an unusual and heated dispute over race in Washington.In a series of Tweets apparently aimed at making a broader point about diplomatic divisions over the mass detention of Muslims in China's Xinjiang province, Lijian Zhao, a diplomat posted in Islamabad, said on Sunday that if "you're in Washington, D.C., you know the white never go" to the southeastern part of the U.S. capital."You are a racist disgrace. And shockingly ignorant too," Rice told Zhao on Twitter. Likely assuming that Zhao was posted in China's mission in Washington, she then addressed her next comment to China's ambassador to the U.S., Cui Tiankai. "Ambassador Cui, I expect better of you and your team. Please do the right thing and send him home."Zhao, who is deputy chief of mission at the Chinese embassy in Pakistan's capital, is often vocal on Twitter against critics of China's infrastructure-building projects in Pakistan and other parts of Asia. Beijing has invested tens of billions of dollars in Pakistan, whose leader Imran Khan has previously dodged questions about the issue.'Shockingly Ignorant'"You are such a disgrace, too. And shockingly ignorant, too. I am based in Islamabad. Truth hurts. I am simply telling the truth," Zhao fired back at Rice on Monday. "To label someone who speak the truth that you don't want to hear a racist, is disgraceful & disgusting."Read More: How China Is Defending Its Detention of Muslims to the WorldZhao didn't immediately respond to phone calls, an email and a direct message on Twitter seeking comment.In a string of messages that appeared aimed at highlighting U.S. hypocrisy on human rights, Zhao referred to everything from income inequality and school shootings in the U.S. to immigration officers separating children from parents.He tweeted a list of mostly-Western nations that condemned China for its actions in Xinjiang as well as a separate list of other countries -- including Pakistan, Cuba, Tajikistan and Nigeria -- that wrote a joint letter to the United Nations supporting Beijing, which Zhao called "a big slap on the face of U.S. & its western cohorts."Outspoken DiplomatsChina's diplomats have become increasingly vocal and outspoken. This month, China's ambassador to London, Liu Xiaoming, gave a rare televised statement accusing the British government of meddling in Hong Kong, the scene of mass protests against Beijing's rule.Earlier this year, China's envoy to Canada publicly accused his hosts of "white supremacy," while the country's chief envoy in South Africa said President Donald Trump's policies were making the U.S. "the enemy of the whole world."Asked about the Twitter dispute on Monday, China's foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang didn't comment directly."I don't know the specific situation," he said. However, he added, "we resolutely oppose the interference of the U.S. and individual Western countries in interfering in China's internal affairs with the Xinjiang issue."To contact the reporters on this story: Iain Marlow in New Delhi at imarlow1@bloomberg.net;Dandan Li in Beijing at dli395@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Chris Kay, Gregory TurkFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

MS-13 Members in Los Angeles Hacked Victims to Death With Machetes: Prosecutors

MS-13 Members in Los Angeles Hacked Victims to Death With Machetes: Prosecutors OSCAR RIVERAMembers of the notorious MS-13 gang in Los Angeles have been charged in connection with the murders of seven people over the last two years-including the dismemberment of a rival gang member whose heart was cut out, federal authorities allege in a 12-count indictment unsealed Tuesday.A total of 22 people linked to the Fulton clique, a faction of the gang based in the San Fernando Valley, have been indicted by a grand jury on several charges, including racketeering and murder, for allegedly committing 200 criminal acts in several states over nine years. Of the over two dozen accused gang members, 20 of them have been charged with murder. While the MS-13 members and associates engaged in common gang behavior-such as narcotics sales, robberies, and extortion schemes-they also used "horrific violence" to control members and intimidate their rivals in Los Angeles, the indictment alleges. Air Force Major Charged With Murder After Missing Wife's Remains Found"We have now taken off the streets nearly two dozen people associated with the most violent arm of MS-13 in Los Angeles, where the gang is believed to have killed 24 people over the past two years," U.S. Attorney Nick Hann said in a press release announcing the charges. "The collaborative law enforcement effort solved several murder cases and dealt a severe blow to members of the gang who engaged in acts of brutality not seen in the region for over 20 years."The 12-count indictment, which is the culmination of a two-year, joint investigation with federal and local authorities, details seven killings, including four victims who were "hacked to death with machetes in the Angeles National Forest," prosecutors said.Formed in the mid-1980s in Los Angeles, MS-13-or Mara Salvatrucha-has a presence in at least 10 states, including New York, and several countries abroad. The epicenter of the transnational organization, prosecutors allege, is in the San Fernando Valley, where El Salvadoran MS-13 members joined with Fulton members to carry out the slayings detailed in the indictment, the court papers allege."MS-13 in Los Angeles was distinct from MS-13 cliques in other parts of the country, because in Los Angeles, MS-13 had to pay extortionate rent payments to the Mexican Mafia, to which MS-13 swore fealty," the indictment states.During a March 2017 murder detailed in the indictment, several MS-13 members allegedly targeted a "rival gang member," only identified as "J.S.," who "crossed out MS-13 graffiti." After abducting, choking, and driving J.S. to a remote location in the Angeles National Forest, six members fatally attacked him with a machete, the indictment says.The victim was then allegedly dismembered before one gang member "carved out J.S.'s heart," and threw his "body parts into a canyon." "The greatest tragedy in these cases is that these young victims likely left their homelands hopeful that in the United States they would find safety and prosperity," Los Angeles County District Attorney Jackie Lacey said on Tuesday. "Instead, these victims had the misfortune of crossing paths with violent gang members who preyed on the vulnerabilities of their immigrant experience."Washington Man Accused of Hurling Molotov Cocktails at ICE Detention Center Killed by PoliceA month later, another victim identified as "G.B." was hit "in back of the head with a pistol, before he was "repeatedly" hacked with a machete, the indictment states. Prosecutors allege some of the MS-13 members believed G.B. was an informant."Once MS-13 had evidence that someone cooperated with law enforcement, by reputation, word of mouth, or by receiving and reviewing law enforcement reports or videos of interviews, MS-13 would issue a 'green light' as to that person, which was an order that if any MS-13 member saw the person who was allegedly or actually cooperating with law enforcement, that person was to be killed on sight," the indictment states. To lure G.B. to the Angeles National Forest, one gang member allegedly "created a Facebook page with the photograph of a female juvenile."Prosecutors allege MS-13 members also used "baseball bats and knives" to murder at least four of the victims, including a man identified in the indictment as E.H. Non-gang members were also the victims of "extreme violence," including  34-year-old Bradley Hanaway, a homeless man who was fatally shot by three men in January in Whitsett Sports Park, the indictment states. "Let's go take out the trash," one MS-13 gang member said to two others on Facebook messenger before going to the North Hollywood park, according to the indictment. Last month, Los Angeles police arrested several MS-13 members as part of a broader investigation into a series of violent events in North Hollywood, including Hanaway's murder. On the Run From MS-13 With Nowhere to GoRead more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

U.S. complains after Russia denies visas to embassy school teachers

U.S. complains after Russia denies visas to embassy school teachers The United States accused Russia on Wednesday of using children as pawns, after Moscow rejected visas for dozens of new teachers at an English-language school set up by the U.S., British and Canadian embassies in Moscow for the children of diplomats. U.S. ambassador Jon Huntsman said 30 teachers who had been due to arrive in Moscow next month had been denied visas, a move he said could force Moscow's Anglo American School to cut the number of children attending.

Lyft broke the law when it failed to tell Chicago about a driver it kicked off its app. A month later he was accused of killing a taxi driver while working for Uber. (LYFT, UBER)

Lyft broke the law when it failed to tell Chicago about a driver it kicked off its app. A month later he was accused of killing a taxi driver while working for Uber. (LYFT, UBER) Lyft could be fined up to $10,000 for failing to report the driver, who has since been charged with murder.

2020 Subaru Outback Starts under $27,000, Tops Out over $40K

2020 Subaru Outback Starts under $27,000, Tops Out over $40K Subaru adds a new off-road-oriented Onyx trim level and the option of the Ascent's turbocharged 2.4-liter engine.

Emails show Iowa official's Tupac fixation before his ouster

Emails show Iowa official's Tupac fixation before his ouster The director of Iowa's social services agency was a huge fan of the late rapper Tupac Shakur, and he frequently let his subordinates know it. Then last month, he sent another such email to all 4,300 agency employees. The agency released 350 pages of emails with the words "Tupac" or "2Pac" sent to and from Foxhoven during his two-year tenure in response to an AP request.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez welcomes New Jersey Democrat to 'The Squad'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez welcomes New Jersey Democrat to 'The Squad' The exchange comes as the president has in recent days repeatedly criticized 'The Squad' of four Democratic congresswomen who are all outspoken Trump critics.

Fed's Powell doubles down on rate cut signal

Fed's Powell doubles down on rate cut signal Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell added more weight to expectations the central bank will cut interest rates later this month, stressing Tuesday that the US inflation outlook is near historic lows. Economists and investors see it as a certainty that the Fed will lower the key borrowing rate at the policy meeting July 30-31, and Powell in recent statements has moved to solidify those predictions by pointing to some concerns about economic growth and persistent weak inflation. Central bankers have "raised concerns about a more prolonged shortfall in inflation below our 2 percent target," Powell said in a prepared speech at a Bank of France event.

A Lawmaker Wants to Know If the Pentagon Ever Exposed the American Public to Ticks Infected with Bioweapons

A Lawmaker Wants to Know If the Pentagon Ever Exposed the American Public to Ticks Infected with Bioweapons President Richard Nixon announced in 1969 that the United States would unilaterally end its offensive biological weapons program. If you've ever wondered if the Pentagon has ever exposed the American public to ticks infected with biological weapons, you're not alone.Rep. Christopher Smith (R-N.J.) authored an amendment to the House version of the Fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act would require the Defense Department Inspector General's Office to find out if the U.S. military experimented with using ticks and other insects as biological weapons between 1950 and 1975.If such experiments took place, the amendment would require the inspector general's office to tell lawmakers if any of the ticks or other bugs "were released outside of any laboratory by accident or experiment design."Smith is the founding co-chair of the House Lyme Disease Caucus. In a news release, Smith said he was inspired to write the amendment after reading books and articles about U.S. military experiments meant to use ticks and other insects to infect enemies.

Landlords Sue NYC Over New Rent Caps on a Million Apartments

Landlords Sue NYC Over New Rent Caps on a Million Apartments (Bloomberg) -- New York City's rent-stabilization law is under attack after a group of real-estate trade groups and landlords sued to overturn regulations that cover more than 1 million apartments.The decades-old law that limits rent increases violates the U.S. Constitution by placing an unfair burden on property owners, particularly those who own pre-1974 buildings with six or more units, according to the suit, filed Monday in federal court in Brooklyn.The state legislature, now under full Democratic control, adopted sweeping tenant protections in June that further cap rent increases and restrict landlords' ability to evict residents. The massive rewrite of the rent rules, which cover about 2.4 million residents, aimed to preserve affordable housing by eliminating tools landlords used to remove units from regulation. The package also abolished a "vacancy bonus" that allowed property owners to raise rents 20% when a tenant left.The plaintiffs say the update further eroded their rights and that the law's "irrationality and arbitrariness" and "web of restrictions override core rights of property owners."Read More: NYC Tenants Get a Rent-Law Blessing That Landlords See as CurseThe landlords claim the rules have morphed over the years so that they benefit too many higher earners, while renters who make less than $35,000 a year account for just 38% of rent-stabilized renters. The breakdown is about the same for unregulated apartments, the groups claim, suggesting the law isn't much different from the unregulated market.The trade groups claim that 22% of rent-stabilized tenants make more than $100,000 a year and that married couples without children are over-represented in rent-stabilized apartments despite being less likely to suffer rental hardship than couples with children.The city said the suit threatens ordinary New Yorkers."Dismantling rent stabilization would be a devastating blow to everyday New Yorkers who are working hard to call this great city home," Jane Meyer, the mayor's deputy press secretary, said in a statement. She said the city would review the suit and continue to "fight to protect affordability, prevent harassment and keep this a city for everyone."Supreme Court SnubTenants-rights groups argued the changes were needed to counter decades of abuse by some landlords and a shrinking supply of affordable housing. Tens of thousands of apartments have been removed from rent-stabilized status, sending rents higher as neighborhoods are gentrified. The effort won support from Governor Andrew Cuomo, a third-term Democrat, as well as New York City mayor and 2020 presidential candidate Bill de Blasio.The U.S. Supreme Court rejected a challenge to the city's rent-stabilization system in 2012, turning away an appeal from landlords who said the city had violated their constitutional rights by limiting rents on three one-bedroom apartments in their Upper West Side brownstone. The state of New York defended the statute, citing previous Supreme Court decisions that judges "should not sit as super-legislatures reviewing matters of economic policy, but should ask only whether a legislature's policy judgments are rational."Among the plaintiffs is the Rent Stabilization Association, which represents 25,000 landlords. When the law was amended, the landlords said it would cause buildings to fall into disrepair because owners wouldn't be able to afford to maintain them.The case is Community Housing Improvement Program v. City of New York, 19-cv-4087, U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York (Brooklyn).(Updates with second paragraph under Supreme Court Snub)\--With assistance from Gerald Porter Jr..To contact the reporters on this story: Erik Larson in New York at elarson4@bloomberg.net;Henry Goldman in New York at hgoldman@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Peter JeffreyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

2 women who say they were abused by Jeffery Epstein have asked a judge not to release him from jail

2 women who say they were abused by Jeffery Epstein have asked a judge not to release him from jail Courtney Wild and Annie Farmer attended Jeffrey Epstein's bail hearing on Monday, and asked a federal judge not to release him as he awaits trial.

Does Melania 'Really Care'? In Her Birthplace Women Blast Her 'Shameful' Complicity With Trump Agenda.

Does Melania 'Really Care'? In Her Birthplace Women Blast Her 'Shameful' Complicity With Trump Agenda. Phtoo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty/ReutersLJUBLJANA, Slovenia-What were first faint rumors turned into palpable buzz: Melania Trump, the most famous daughter of Slovenia, might finally visit her homeland. Her father, Viktor Knavs, was seen here driving a white Maybach with Florida plates between the capital and Melania's hometown of Sevnica preparing the way, it was said, for a spectacular homecoming. But as the rumors multiplied, so did a widespread sense of disappointment that America's first lady has not been back to her motherland for 15 years. Young Melania, From Model Student to Cover GirlSeveral of Slovenia's leading women decided the time might be ripe to invite Melania Knavs Trump back here for a bit of dialogue about some major global issues. Members of Femmes Sans Frontières (Women Without Borders) brainstormed at the elegant villa of Jerca Legan, the organization's president, in the old town of Ljubljana. They were environmentalists, writers, artists, entrepreneurs, bureaucrats, lawyers and business developers, who decided to issue a formal invitation.Some, like Slovenian fashion diva Maja Ferme, have known Melania for several years, as a friend and benefactor for various charities; others had expected Melania to be more assertive in the international arena.  "Frankly, I have not heard a single strong statement by Melania in years, which is kind of embarrassing, if not shameful," said communications consultant Darinka Pavlic Kamien.Nena Cresnar Pregar, who advises foreign investors interested in Slovenian regions, said she respected Melanja Knavs, the young ambitious model who first escaped her provincial socialist Sevnica to Slovenia's capital, then to Western Europe, and finally to the United States. "She had more courage in her youth, I would inspire her to speak out for equality," Cresnar Pregar said, and that would be in contrast to her husband who is "spreading hatred in every Twitter post.""We would also want her to be more engaged on freeing immigrants' children from prisons, on global climate change issues. Otherwise she'll be remembered for her 'Don't Care' jacket," said Cresnar Pregar.Last October, on her way to visit a detention center for immigrant children in Texas, Melania Trump made headlines wearing a $39 Zara jacket that said in splashy white letters across the back, "I Really Don't Care Do U?" She subsequently said the reference was not supposed to be to the children but to the ever-prying, often critical press. "I wore the jacket to go on the plane and off the plane," Mrs. Trump explained to ABC News. "And it was for the people and for the left-wing media to show them that I don't care. You will not stop me to do what I feel is right.""It was kind of a message," said the first lady. "I would prefer that they would focus on what I do and my initiatives, than what I wear."Her Slovene compatriots would like to give her just that chance. Slovenia's former state secretary, Tico Zupancic, embraced the initiative coming from the Slovenian civil groups.  "Melania might realize she's been a puppet on invisible strings, recalculate her position and decide that her bank accounts are not as important as her reputation," Zupancic told The Daily Beast. "The group of brilliant women would like to invite her to her homeland, she should use this chance to break free, grow vocal." From Melania's hometown of Sevnica, to the resort town of Piran, to the capital Ljubljana, when she first became first lady she was the object of tremendous pride. But now, many wonder why Melania does not seem to care about Slovenia as she balances on top of the world in her high heels.A local artist, Ales Zupevc, placed a wooden statue of America's first lady in her blue inaugural dress on the bank of the Sava River. The rough-hewn wooden Melania is waving to her hometown of Sevnica, which is just a few kilometers away, as if to say, "Hello, here I am." Inside the Cult of Melania TrumpBut in real life all that people have heard from her are calls from her lawyers coming to sue those who publish scandalous articles about the ex-model's past, on the one hand, or who name their businesses or merchandise after her.  "No word of congratulations arrived from the White House on June 25, the Statehood Day," Melania Trump's biographer, Bojan Pozar, said in an interview. "The way Melania's treated Slovenia has been fundamentally wrong." (The State Department did issue a pro forma congratulations on Statehood Day.) The vice chair of the American Chamber of Commerce in Europe, Ajsa Vodnik, defended Melania, blaming the hostility of journalists for keeping her away from Slovenia. Vodnik, who befriended Melanja Knavs when she was 17, remembers "a really modest girl" in the late 1980s. Vodnik said in a recent interview she has been in touch with the first lady's staffers, and, "She really wants to come."  Vodnik says she is proud that the Slovene language is spoken at the White House. "Her son speaks Slovene with his grandparents in the White House," she said. "The language is very important." News reports about the U.S. President's alleged cheating on his wife sounded disturbing but were not the point, Vodnik said. "We should not be thinking who they sleep with," she insisted, meaning the world's male leaders. "We women should preserve peace and security today, as the world is not in a great position." Vodnik added that the two most well known names of world leaders today are Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. Looking back at Slovenia's history, Violeta Bulc, European Commissioner for Transport, cannot not think of a single woman leader who has a chance to make a difference. She is calling for women leaders to learn from the past. On one of her visits in Washington, Bulc tried to meet with Melania Trump, but it didn't happen. "I would tell her: 'Embrace humanity at its best, help people, give people a chance,' although I am not sure how much power Melania has. She seems to be strong, but quiet. Never in her wildest dreams did she imagine she'd become the First Lady of the United States." Trump once said that his years with Melania had been his most successful years.Slovenia's leading environmentalist, Gaja Brecelj, believes that during the years left of Trump's presidency Melania could help. "If Trump does not believe in global climate change, it does not matter. It's time for Melania to become her own person, think with her own head," Brecelj said."Hello, Melania, do this for Barron, for his children, push your husband: we need to change the world's energy system, traffic system-what we all do now will show in 100 years."The last time America's first lady visited her homeland, in July 2004, was to introduce her future husband to her parents. The Grand Hotel Toplica at Lake Bled still has a picture of Melania and her boyfriend Donald from that last visit. It is tacked on a wall in the hallway between pictures of other significant visitors, including a Russian ballerina, Anna Plisetskaya, and a former Russian parliament member, Alexander Rozenbaum.If Melania Trump comes back now, the atmosphere would be rather different. "We invite Melania to join our movement of women without borders, we'd empower her," Jerca Legan said at the gathering of Slovene women. "She still has time to make the difference, if she does not want to live in a world of hate, where kids sit terrified on the bare floor of prisons. If she cares."Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

Vietnam, China embroiled in South China Sea standoff

Vietnam, China embroiled in South China Sea standoff Vietnamese and Chinese ships have been embroiled in a weeks-long standoff near an offshore oil block in disputed waters of the South China Sea, which fall within Vietnam's exclusive economic zone, two Washington-based think-tanks said on Wednesday. China's U-shaped "nine-dash line" marks a vast expanse of the South China Sea that it claims, including large swathes of Vietnam's continental shelf where it has awarded oil concessions. One of the oil blocks it surveyed is licensed by Vietnam to Spanish energy firm Repsol , which was forced last year and in 2017 to cease operations in Vietnamese waters because of pressure from China.

June was the warmest June ever recorded, but there's a bigger problem

June was the warmest June ever recorded, but there's a bigger problem In 139 years of record-keeping, this June was the warmest June ever recorded. But June 2019 also revealed a deeper warming reality. The first half of 2019, January through June, finished up as the second warmest half-year on record, newly released NASA data shows. On top of that, each of the last five January through Junes are now the five warmest such spans on record. Only 2016 started off hotter than 2019. "At this point, the inexorable increase in global temperatures is entirely predictable," said Sarah Green, an environmental chemist at Michigan Technological University. She noted that NASA's updated data is added proof that climate models have accurately predicted Earth's continued warming as heat-trapping gasses amass in the atmosphere."As we have shown in recent work, the record warm streaks we've seen in recent years simply cannot be explained without accounting for the profound impact we are having on the planet through the burning of fossil fuels and the resulting increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations," added climate scientist Michael Mann, the director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University.Indeed, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, already at their highest levels in at least 800,000 years, are now accelerating at rates that are unprecedented in both the historic and geologic record."The latest numbers are just another reminder that the impacts of human-caused warming are no longer subtle," said Mann. "We're seeing them play out in terms of both unprecedented extreme weather events and the sorts of planetary-scale temperature extremes betrayed by these latest numbers."The warmest January through Junes on record.Image: nasa gissThe well-predicted consequences of this heating are now unfolding. Here are some, of many, examples:  * Warming climes have doubled the amount of land burned by wildfires in the U.S. over the last 30 years, as plants and trees, notably in California, get baked dry. * Greenland -- home to the second largest ice sheet on Earth -- is melting at unprecedented rates. * The last 12 months have been the wettest 12 months in U.S. history, leading to widespread flooding around the nation (For every 1 degree Celsius, or 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit, of warming, the air can hold 7 percent more water.) * The Arctic is on fire. * Ocean temperatures are going up, and up, and up.  * Since 1961, Earth's glaciers lost 9 trillion tons of ice. That's the weight of 27 billion 747s. * Heat waves are increasing in duration and frequency, while smashing records. * Daily high record temperatures are dominating daily low records. Overall, the atmosphere is experiencing an accelerated upward temperature climb, though there are some ups and downs within the greater warming trend. This is due to natural climatic influences, particularly from events like El Niño, which can give global temperatures an added kick. > NASA global mean June temperature is out! Guess what - it's been the hottest June on record. Definitely felt like that in Germany... climatecrisis FridaysForFuture pic.twitter.com/vkOFP22NNM> > -- Stefan Rahmstorf (@rahmstorf) July 15, 2019"The year-to-year variations of the global temperature may be affected by El Niño, etc., but in the long-term [global temperature] keeps increasing steadily," said NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies scientist Makiko Sato, who helped prepare the June climate observations. SEE ALSO: This scientist keeps winning money from people who bet against climate changeThis June was "easily" the warmest June on record, NASA noted, and overall, this year's January through June temperatures were 1.4 degrees Celsius (or 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit) above average temperatures in the late 1800s. Seasonal temperature trends.Image: nasa Giss2019 will almost certainly end up being one of the hottest years on record. This is in line with another stark trend. Eighteen of the 19 warmest years on record have occurred since 2001 -- and the five hottest years have occurred in each of the last five years. (It's not just the first half of each year setting records.)"This is further evidence that temperatures will keep rising until government policies that decrease greenhouse gas emissions are actually implemented," emphasized Green.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?

The Latest: Phoenix reaches hottest temperature of the year

The Latest: Phoenix reaches hottest temperature of the year Phoenix is having its hottest day of the year. The National Weather Service in Phoenix confirmed on social media Tuesday afternoon that the city's high temperature has hit 115 degrees. The sweltering conditions prompted the agency to issue an excessive heat warning earlier in the day.

'The answer is no': Boris Johnson warns Trump he won't support war with Iran

'The answer is no': Boris Johnson warns Trump he won't support war with Iran "If you were to ask me whether I think should we now... be supporting military action against Iran, then the answer is no."

Ebola patient in DR Congo city of Goma has died: governor

Ebola patient in DR Congo city of Goma has died: governor The first patient to be diagnosed with Ebola in the eastern DR Congo city of Goma has died, the governor of North Kivu province said on Tuesday. The case -- the first in a major urban hub in the region's nearly year-old epidemic of the disease -- has sparked deep concern in neighbouring Rwanda and at the UN. The UN's World Health Organization will convene its emergency response board on Wednesday to assess whether the outbreak should be declared a "public health emergency of international concern", a move that would step up the global response.

Police: 19-year-old lifeguard attacked during large altercation at pool in Mayfair

Police: 19-year-old lifeguard attacked during large altercation at pool in Mayfair Philadelphia police are investigating after they say a 19-year-old lifeguard was attacked in the city's Mayfair section.

Big Guns: Army Prototypes Range-Doubling New Artillery Weapon to Outgun Russia

Big Guns: Army Prototypes Range-Doubling New Artillery Weapon to Outgun Russia The Army is building prototypes of a new artillery cannon that can more than double the range of existing weapons and vastly alter the strategic and tactical landscape shaping land war into the future.The Army program, called Extended Range Cannon Artillery, has been developing for several years; it is now entering a new phase through an Army deal with BAE Systems to build "Increment 1" prototypes."This prototype phase will address capability gaps in the Army's indirect fire systems and improve the rate and range of fire with the development of power distribution software and hardware integration solutions," a BAE Systems statement said.During testing thus far, the Army has successfully fired a 155mm artillery round 62 kilometers - marking a technical breakthrough in the realm of land-based weapons and progressing toward its stated goal of being able to outrange and outgun Russian and Chinese weapons.Currently, most land-fired artillery shot from an M777 Towed Howitzer or Self-Propelled Howitzer are able to pinpoint targets out to 30km - so hitting 62km dramatically changes Army offensive attack capability. As part of an effort to ensure the heavy M777 is sufficiently mobile, the Army completed a "mobility" demonstration of ERCA prototypes last year.

Over-the-Top Ice Cream Sandwich Recipes That Are Worth Every Calorie

Over-the-Top Ice Cream Sandwich Recipes That Are Worth Every Calorie

Teenage girl making sexual abuse claim sexually assaulted by detective dealing with case

Teenage girl making sexual abuse claim sexually assaulted by detective dealing with case A Los Angeles County sex crimes investigator accused of raping a teenager after having been assigned to investigate her previous sexual assault allegations has pleaded guilty to lesser charges, and is expected to be sentenced to three years in prison.It was at least the third time the detective, Neil David Kimball of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, was accused of misconduct while on duty, though he was not charged as a result of the first two allegations.District Attorney Gregory Totten of Ventura County, whose office prosecuted the case, said in a statement that Kimball, 46, met the then-15-year-old victim in 2017 when she reported a sexual assault.He befriended her and then sexually assaulted her, according to the statement.Kimball was originally charged with raping the victim while she was tied or bound. Kimball was also accused of "witness intimidation by threat of force".But Patrice Koenig, a spokesperson for the district attorney's office, said that prosecutors later determined they could not prove that Kimball had used force during the encounter, which she said took place in his trailer in Camarillo, in southern Ventura County.The girl did not report the encounter. Rather, when a different officer took over her case about a year later, her father told the new investigator about the assault, Ms Koenig said.Kimball pleaded guilty last week to a lewd act with a child and unlawful sexual intercourse, and is expected to be sentenced to three years in prison at his next appearance, on 8 August. He must also register as a sex offender.In a statement, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said that Kimball's pay was suspended in March and that it was seeking to terminate him immediately. A lawyer for Kimball declined to comment.Kimball's plea comes just more than a month after Sara Abusheikh, a Los Angeles fashion designer, wrote in a post on Medium about her experience with the detective after she was sexually assaulted by an acquaintance in 2014, and reported it to the authorities.Kimball was assigned to her case, but she wrote that he never investigated, and instead said wildly inappropriate things to her.Ms Abusheikh wrote that Kimball teased her about going back to her assailant and suggested she "let him make love to you gently"."His only interest in the details of my rape came in the form of perverse, sick questions, and he - most tellingly - suggested he come inside to get high," she wrote.She later filed a restraining order against her assailant, which led Kimball to joke that she was paranoid, she wrote. When she reported his inappropriate behaviour to his supervisor, word got back to Kimball immediately, she added.The next summer, after getting help from a rape treatment centre, she met with the Los Angeles County district attorney's office, which declined to prosecute the case, she wrote.A deputy district attorney told her Kimball was "a fine detective" and insisted there was no evidence to back up her claim, she wrote."And the Special Victims Bureau? It only functioned to protect not one, but two, alleged rapists," Ms Abusheikh concluded in her essay.The Los Angeles County district attorney's office declined to comment on Ms Abusheikh's post.Last year, Ms Abusheikh shared screenshots of text messages she said were from Kimball with The Daily Beast, as well as records of email exchanges with lawyers and patient advocates from the rape treatment centre. She did not return calls or respond to messages seeking further comment.Kimball, a 20-year veteran of the sheriff's department, was assigned to the Special Victims Bureau in 2013, The Los Angeles Times reported.The bureau has been involved in high-profile cases, including accusations by a young actor that he was sexually abused by Asia Argento, a leading figure in the MeToo movement, who had herself accused the producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault. She denied the allegations.In 2009, Kimball was investigated for sexual battery but not charged after an episode at a hotel the previous year, The Los Angeles Times reported.According to the report, which was based on a prosecutor's memo, the detective had questioned a group of friends in a parking lot.Afterward, women in the group and Kimball went to a hotel room, where some of the women stripped down to their underwear and got into a hot tub as he encouraged them, the memo stated.It also said that one woman accused the detective of grabbing her hand and trying to place it on his genitals.But no charges were filed. Witnesses gave contradictory statements, there was a lack of evidence and the complainant failed to cooperate with investigators, the memo said.Greg Risling, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles County district attorney, confirmed that the office had declined to prosecute Kimball over the hotel incident. In an email, he said that no other cases involving the detective were under review.The Ventura County District Attorney's Office had also urged any additional victims to come forward, Ms Koenig said, but none did so.Asked last year why Kimball was selected to serve in the Special Victims Bureau even after the 2008 hotel allegations, the sheriff's department told The Los Angeles Times it would "conduct a review of the internal process" related to the assignment.The department did not respond to a question about the outcome of that review.Grier Weeks, senior executive at the National Association to Protect Children, a non-profit in Knoxville, Tennessee, that pushes for child protection laws, said that the sentence was too light considering the severity of the crime."There should be more severe penalties for people in positions of authority or trust who assault a child," he said. "It's something that has to be treated as the most serious type of assault."New York Times

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