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Novartis' breast cancer treatment wins FDA approval

Novartis' breast cancer treatment wins FDA approval The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said on Friday it approved Novartis AG's treatment in combination with hormone therapy fulvestrant for postmenopausal women, as well as men, with a form of advanced breast cancer. The drug, alpelisib, to be marketed with the brand name Piqray, belongs to a class of drugs known as PI3K inhibitors and is the first of its kind to be approved, the FDA said in a statement.

Inslee says he's hit donor threshold for presidential debate

Inslee says he's hit donor threshold for presidential debate LAS VEGAS (AP) - Washington Gov. Jay Inslee says he's hit a fundraising threshold to qualify for the Democratic presidential debates slated to begin next month.

SpaceX reports raising a billion dollars for Starlink and Starship space projects

SpaceX reports raising a billion dollars for Starlink and Starship space projects On the heels of a successful 60-satellite launch, SpaceX says it has raised more than $1 billion for its Starlink satellite internet venture and its super-heavy-lift Starship rocket development effort. The higher-than-expected investments were reported today in two amended filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. One financing round, which was opened last December, netted $486 million. The other, which opened last month, brought in $535 million. And between the two rounds, there was still $18.8 million in equity to offer, according to the filings. The SEC forms indicate that the earlier round involved eight investors, and the later round... Read More

Yes, There's a Public-Health Crisis at the Border

Yes, There's a Public-Health Crisis at the Border The humanitarian crisis at our southern border continues. Earlier this week, a 16-year-old Guatemalan boy, Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez, who was reportedly sick with the flu, died in border-patrol custody. Other detainees at the Border Patrol's Centralized Processing Center in McAllen, Texas, have shown high fevers and flu-like symptoms. Medical staff at the facility have stopped taking in new migrants to help avoid the spread of illness. Three dozen migrants have been quarantined and 32 more cases of the flu have been confirmed.The flu can kill, either by initially overwhelming your immune system or because of associated complications, including pneumonia. It may spread fairly rapidly, especially at a detention center, where the conditions are far from ideal and detainees are close together. It is not as wildly contagious as measles, for example, but it tends to infect one out of four people who are exposed to it. It is no longer flu season, but sporadic cases are still appearing, and may spread more easily among a population that is largely unvaccinated.But Carlos's tragic death brings up larger questions about the handling of infectious diseases among the surge of migrants coming here from Central America and how these problems can be better addressed. Reports of recent outbreaks include not only influenza, but mumps and chicken pox as well.Carlos reportedly said he wasn't feeling well last Sunday morning, and saw a nurse practitioner at the center who recommended Tamiflu, an effective antiviral drug against influenza. When administered in a timely manner, Tamiflu can decrease the severity and the duration of symptoms and limit their spread. This would appear to have been a correct and timely intervention.But instead of being sent to a hospital or a more medically sophisticated Health and Human Services supervised facility, Carlos was sent to another Border Patrol station 20 miles away to be isolated. Isolation makes sense to help contain the disease, though the flu can be transmitted several days before the onset of symptoms (typically fever, fatigue, muscle aches, headache, sore throat), and no border station is equipped to properly handle a patient very sick with the flu. Carlos was later found dead there.It's clear that the Border Patrol is struggling to handle the influx of migrants. It is building tent cities in the area, where infectious diseases including flu can continue to spread. Given the scale of the border crisis, it is not their fault that illness is occurring and spreading, though they do have a role in identification, treatment, and containment of disease. The temperatures inside the detention centers are reportedly quite cold, and respiratory viruses including flu typically travel farther in cold low humidity temperatures.Unfortunately, politics rather than public health has been predominating. The White House has asked for $3 billion to help the Department of Health and Human Services provide care for unaccompanied minors such as Carlos as part of a $4.5 billion request for emergency services at the border. Detained migrant children are supposed to be placed into shelters managed by HHS within three days. But HHS approval is needed, and there was a delay in Carlos's case - and in many other cases.Democrats in Congress have expressed concern that emergency funds would be used to detain more migrants, rather than to provide food and humanitarian assistance. The $4.5 billion has been deleted from a $19 billion disaster-aid bill that has just passed the Senate.This concern may or may not be justified, but as a physician I would like to see the focus shift from the current policy-oriented debate to one that takes public-health concerns seriously. Carlos didn't show symptoms when he was originally detained. If he had simply been released into the community, he could still have spread the flu, missed timely medical intervention, and ending up dying tragically.What would work best for the undocumented children coming into this country and for the rest of us would be to show our most humane face. Detaining for the purpose of illness control alone makes sense, but then we must provide the health care needed to control disease and save lives. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention must become more heavily involved. They already have quarantine stations and are overseeing the situation but must have more boots on the ground. It's time for the country to realize that there is a legitimate public-health emergency at the border.

Lake Tahoe's famed water gets clearer after all-time low

Lake Tahoe's famed water gets clearer after all-time low RENO, Nev. (AP) - The clarity of Lake Tahoe's cobalt blue water improved last year from its worst level in a half-century after weather and runoff returned to more normal conditions at the alpine lake straddling the California-Nevada line.

There Are Hundreds of Different Headaches - Which Kind Do You Get?

There Are Hundreds of Different Headaches - Which Kind Do You Get? Here's what you need to know.

Why Maxar Stock Dropped 10% Today

Why Maxar Stock Dropped 10% Today The company has its eyes on the moon -- but investors may be more concerned with the balance sheet.

China Says Its New Bullet Train Will Hit 373 mph

China Says Its New Bullet Train Will Hit 373 mph That would be a really fast train.

SpaceX Discloses $1 Billion Raised After First Satellite Launch

SpaceX Discloses $1 Billion Raised After First Satellite Launch SpaceX disclosed the influx of cash after launching the first 60 satellites into orbit for its Starlink project, which involves building a constellation that beams broadband to underserved areas across the globe. Fellow billionaire Jeff Bezos is also pursuing the business of becoming a space-based internet provider.

Scientists Develop the First Smartphone App to Test for Ear Infections in Children

Scientists Develop the First Smartphone App to Test for Ear Infections in Children Finally, a good reason to look at a screen.

Colorado Becomes First State to Limit the Cost of Insulin

Colorado Becomes First State to Limit the Cost of Insulin Colorado passed a historic bill limiting how much residents with diabetes will have to pay for insulin. Find out how much they'll be paying and what inspired the bill.

This Woman's Dental Fillings Caused an Allergic Reaction That Caused an Eczema Flare Up

This Woman's Dental Fillings Caused an Allergic Reaction That Caused an Eczema Flare Up Yes, dental work can cause your feet to break out in a rash.

Novartis $2 million gene therapy for rare disorder is world's most expensive drug

Novartis $2 million gene therapy for rare disorder is world's most expensive drug The Food and Drug Administration approved Zolgensma for pediatric patients under age 2 with SMA, including those not yet showing symptoms. Novartis executives defended the price, saying that as a one-time treatment it would ultimately save patients who would have instead been on expensive long-term treatments that cost several hundred thousand dollars a year. Novartis touched off a debate over what gene therapy is worth last year, estimating its treatment would be cost effective at up to $5 million per patient.

People may one day live on Mars in these NASA-approved, 3D-printed homes-take a look inside

People may one day live on Mars in these NASA-approved, 3D-printed homes-take a look inside A NASA contest asked dozens of architects and technology experts to submit designs for 3D-printed habitats that could one day house humans on Mars. These are the designs that won.

France acknowledges Polynesian islands 'strong-armed' into dangerous nuclear tests

France acknowledges Polynesian islands 'strong-armed' into dangerous nuclear tests France has officially acknowledged for the first time that French Polynesians were effectively forced into accepting almost 200 nuclear tests conducted over a 30-year period, and that it is responsible for compensating them for the illnesses caused by the fallout. The French parliament issued the much-awaited admission in a bill reforming the status of the collectivity of 118 islands in the South Pacific, with MPs saying the change should make it easier for the local population to request compensation for cancer and other illnesses linked to radioactivity. From 1966 to 1996, France carried out 193 nuclear tests around the paradise islands, including Bora Bora and Tahiti, immortalised by Paul Gauguin. Images of a mushroom cloud over the Moruroa atoll, one of two used as test sites along with Fangataufa, provoked international protests. Charles De Gaulle and subsequent presidents had thanked French Polynesians for their role in assuring the grandeur of France by allowing it to conduct the tests. But in the parliamentary bill, France acknowledges that the islands were "called upon" - effectively strong-armed - into accepting the tests for the purposes of "building (its) nuclear deterrent and national defence".  It also stipulates that the French state will "ensure the maintenance and surveillance of the sites concerned" and "support the economic and structural reconversion of French Polynesia following the cessation of nuclear tests".  Patrice Bouveret of the Observatoire des armements (Armaments Observatory), an independent organisation that has been assessing the impacts of French nuclear testing in Polynesia since 1984, welcomed the reform. "It recognises the fact that local people's health could have been affected and thus the French state's responsibility in compensating them for such damage. Until now, the entire French discourse was that the tests were 'clean' - that was the actual word used - and that they had taken all due precautions for staff and locals." However, he said it was a "scandal" that it had taken 23 years for France to officially recognise its responsibility, and said there was nothing in the law on the ill-effects on future generations. World's most powerful nuclear tests Separatist Polynesian MP Moetai Brotherson also expressed scepticism, saying the reform offered no concrete steps towards financial reparation. But for the Polynesian MP Maina Sage, the reform amounted to "recognition of clear acts of compensation" and "the fact that this should translate into support on a sanitary, ecological and economic level." Last year, French Polynesian President Edouard Fritch admitted that its leaders had lied to the population for three decades over the dangers of nuclear testing. "I'm not surprised that I've been called a liar for 30 years. We lied to this population that the tests were clean. We lied," Mr Fritch told officials in filmed footage. Bowing to decades of pressure, in 2010 the French government offered millions of euros in compensation for the government's 201 nuclear tests in the South Pacific and Algeria.  This led to 1,500 cases of compensation for military and other personnel at the Polynesian nuclear sites. But a clause suggesting the tests were of "negligible risk" for the rest of the population made it well-nigh impossible for them to apply, despite disproportionate rates of thyroid cancer and leukemia among Polynesia's 280,000 residents. Cancer rates are 30 per cent higher than average. To date, only a few dozen have received compensation. In 2016, then-President Francois Hollande acknowledged during a visit that the tests did have consequences for the environment and residents' health but also talked up the importance of the tests for France as a nuclear power. Three years earlier, declassified defense ministry papers exposed them as being far more toxic than previously acknowledged amid reports that the whole of French Polynesia had been hit by levels of plutonium in the aftermath of the testing. Tahiti, these suggested, was exposed to 500 times the maximum accepted levels of radiation. Last year, French Polynesia's pro-independence leader Oscar Temaru accused France of "nuclear racism" for conducting the tests in the knowledge they were harmful.

NASA Confirms A Car-Sized Fireball Lit Up The Sky Over South Australia

NASA Confirms A Car-Sized Fireball Lit Up The Sky Over South Australia The meteor was not even that big by NASA's standards.

South Korea orders further arrests at Samsung Electronics over accounting scandal

South Korea orders further arrests at Samsung Electronics over accounting scandal A South Korean court approved arrest warrants on Saturday for two executives at Samsung Electronics Co Ltd over their alleged roles in a suspected accounting fraud at the biotech arm of Samsung Group. The Seoul Central District Court said in a statement it had granted warrants to arrest the executives due to concerns over possible destruction of evidence. Two Samsung Electronics officials were also arrested on suspicion of destroying evidence earlier this month.

Boeing bounces back with successful test of Starliner space taxi's propulsion system

Boeing bounces back with successful test of Starliner space taxi's propulsion system Boeing has successfully run the propulsion system for its CST-100 Starliner space taxi through the same test it failed almost a year ago, marking a significant step toward carrying astronauts to the International Space Station. The thruster firing for Starliner's launch abort system was part of a series of tests conducted on Thursday at the White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico. A similar test went awry last June, due to an unwanted leak of propellant. No hardware was destroyed, but the problem contributed to delays for Starliner's first flight. The current schedule calls for the capsule to be launched... Read More

Elon Musk: Jeff Bezos's plan to live in space 'makes no sense'

Elon Musk: Jeff Bezos's plan to live in space 'makes no sense' Tesla and SpaceX boss Elon Musk and Amazon and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos have different visions for humans will one day live in space.

Youths rally across Europe in pre-vote climate protest

Youths rally across Europe in pre-vote climate protest From Lisbon to Oslo, children and youths skipped school and voiced their anxiety about inheriting a warming planet with melting ice caps and worsening storms, floods and droughts. "We are all in the same boat," read a protest sign in Madrid, expressing the shared sentiment of youngsters who rallied in cities across more than 120 countries. Some 15,000 activists marched in Paris, while a roughly equal number demonstrated at Berlin's iconic Brandenburg Gate, chanting "What do we want?

What Is Powassan Virus? This Tick-borne Illness Can Cause Fatal Swelling of the Brain

What Is Powassan Virus? This Tick-borne Illness Can Cause Fatal Swelling of the Brain The disease is still very rare, but about 10% of people who get it die.

The Most Common Types of Arthritis, and Who's at Risk for Each

The Most Common Types of Arthritis, and Who's at Risk for Each More than 100 conditions involve inflammation of the joints.

Everything That Goes Into Making an Arc'teryx Jacket

Everything That Goes Into Making an Arc'teryx Jacket Vancouver-based company keeps entire process in-house for intricate handmade gear.

Ford is testing a two-legged delivery robot that brings parcels to your doorstep

Ford is testing a two-legged delivery robot that brings parcels to your doorstep If we want to fully automate deliveries, we'd have to come up with a way to get packages from the self-driving vehicle to the doorstepFord and Agility Robotics teamed up to do exactly that - finally solve the last mile delivery problem. Digit is a two-legged, headless robot that unfolds itself from the back of a self-driving van and brings your parcel to your doorstep. Read more...More about Mashable Video, Ford, Humanoid Robot, Delivery Robot, and Agility

At Cannes, stars raise over $15 mn for AIDS research

At Cannes, stars raise over $15 mn for AIDS research Stars of the movies and the music world raised more than $15 million for AIDS research at Cannes film festival's most glamorous party, organisers said on Friday.

A CEO Council on Climate Change? That Sounds Familiar

A CEO Council on Climate Change? That Sounds Familiar Twelve years ago, a similar group (featuring some of the same players) formed the U.S. Climate Action Partnership, a large corporate push for legislation to cap carbon dioxide emissions. The economic basis for the climate story in 2007 is a completely different story to today.

A CEO Council on Climate Change? That Sounds Familiar

A CEO Council on Climate Change? That Sounds Familiar Twelve years ago, a similar group (featuring some of the same players) formed the U.S. Climate Action Partnership, a large corporate push for legislation to cap carbon dioxide emissions. The economic basis for the climate story in 2007 is a completely different story to today.

Fire in commercial center in India kills at least 17

Fire in commercial center in India kills at least 17 At least 17 people were killed when a fire broke out in a four-story commercial building in the city of Surat in India's western state of Gujarat on Friday, police said. Television footage broadcast by private channel NDTV showed people jumping off the top floor of the Takshashila building or trying to escape by climbing down, as thick smoke billowed out. Most of the dead were students who had been attending class at a tuition center housed in the building, according to the spokesman for the office of Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani.

Climate protesters turn out as Europe votes on parliament

Climate protesters turn out as Europe votes on parliament BERLIN (AP) - Protesters - many of them too young to vote - took to the streets Friday across the European Union to demand tougher action against global warming as the 28-nation bloc elects a new parliament.

SpaceX launches 60 little satellites, with many more to come

SpaceX launches 60 little satellites, with many more to come CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) - SpaceX has launched 60 little satellites, the first of thousands that founder Elon Musk plans to put in orbit for global internet coverage.

At Cannes, stars raise over $15 mn for AIDS research

At Cannes, stars raise over $15 mn for AIDS research Stars of the movies and the music world raised more than $15 million for AIDS research at Cannes film festival's most glamorous party, organisers said on Friday. After 10 days of uncharactistically bad weather, the sun finally put in an appearance at the glittering event late Thursday, with the stars quaffing champagne on a balmy evening in the gardens of the exclusive Eden Roc hotel at Cap d'Antibes, near Cannes. The social highlight of the festival, the charity dinner laid on by the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amFAR) brought in a host of big hitters among them Antonio Banderas, Eva Longoria, Andie MacDowell, Adrien Brody, Tom Jones, Tommy Hilfiger, Pamela Anderson and Donald Trump's youngest daughter Tiffany.

Couples Are More Likely to Divorce When Wives Get Sick, Not Husbands

Couples Are More Likely to Divorce When Wives Get Sick, Not Husbands Meanwhile, women tend to stand by their sick husbands.

Research Reveals Ancient Egyptians Loved Watermelon

Research Reveals Ancient Egyptians Loved Watermelon (But maybe not as much as Southerners.)

Pharma Stock Roundup: MRK's Cancer Biotech Buyout, ABBV, LLY's Pipeline Updates

Pharma Stock Roundup: MRK's Cancer Biotech Buyout, ABBV, LLY's Pipeline Updates Key highlights of the week include Merck's (MRK) offer to buy private cancer biotech and AbbVie (ABBV) and Lilly's (LLY) updates from clinical studies.

3 Stocks to Win Big in the Fight Against Cancer

3 Stocks to Win Big in the Fight Against Cancer We highlight three stocks that are using innovative ways to treat cancer, also called malignancy. These stocks are also great long-term investments.

Make This Flavor-Packed Old Fashioned for Memorial Day Weekend

Make This Flavor-Packed Old Fashioned for Memorial Day Weekend Kick off summer with a deliciously complex rye that bourbon drinkers love.

Teen Climate Activist Rips Politicians Ahead of EU Vote

Teen Climate Activist Rips Politicians Ahead of EU Vote On a day when teenagers across the world again mobilized against climate inaction, the movement's icon, Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, said the continent's policy makers -- including environmentalists -- are all failing to heed the climate crisis. "There's no political party that's doing anywhere near enough," Thunberg said in an interview in Stockholm on Friday. Thunberg spoke as youths went on strike in a so-called Fridays for Future event spanning cities across the world.

Apple Tariff `Doomsday Calls' Are Unrealistic, Wedbush Says

Apple Tariff `Doomsday Calls' Are Unrealistic, Wedbush Says "We believe calls of EPS getting hit by 20%/30%+ with China being closed off as a region for Cupertino remains 'doomsday calls' that are simply not realistic in our opinion," analyst Daniel Ives writes. Apple is a major strategic player in the China technology ecosystem, he said, noting that the company's China-based manufacturer, Foxconn, employs 1.4 million in the region.

A big red reason not to dig a mine in Alaska's fat bear country

A big red reason not to dig a mine in Alaska's fat bear country Like the sun promises to rise each morning, hordes of crimson salmon -- numbering in the tens of millions -- faithfully return to Alaska's Bristol Bay each summer.This land of untrammeled rivers, streams, and lakes is home to the richest run of sockeye salmon on Earth. And largely for that reason, it's also the realm of Alaska's gloriously fat bears, who gobble the hefty 4,500 calorie fish -- sometimes a dozen each hour -- throughout the fleeting summer.  Yet, the Trump administration may allow a Canadian mining company to dig a gold and copper mine one mile wide and 1,970 feet deep into the heart of the Bristol Bay watershed, called the Pebble Mine. Previously, the Obama Administration effectively killed the mining plans, citing "significant and unacceptable adverse effects" to the biologically and economically valuable ecosystem, but the Trump administration has reversed course, and is officially reconsidering the quarry. It's a move harshly questioned by Bristol Bay locals, scientists, and law experts alike. "How does helping this underfunded Canadian company make America great again?" wondered Joel Reynolds, a senior attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council. Razing 73 miles of streams and 3,458 acres of wilderness (while building two water pollution treatment plants) in a corner of Bristol Bay is of little environmental concern to the mining company, Northern Dynasty, whose PR organization's spokesperson told Mashable in March that overall salmon population numbers would not be impacted. Yet, a new study published in the journal Science shows the stability and productivity of these Alaskan rivers is dictated by the vitality of smaller components of the greater watershed. A small portion of the river system may be incredibly productive one year, supporting or stabilizing a river's salmon populaton while other areas see weaker fish numbers."Different chunks, components, and patches tend to be more or less important in a given year," said Sean Brennan, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington's School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and lead author of the study. "Any given year, some really small area could be disproportionately important."Sockeye salmon migrating up a stream.Image: Jason Ching / University of Washington"A landscape or entire river system doesn't operate as a simple sum of its parts," added Brennan, noting that different zones "flicker on or flicker off" over time.This fluctuating activity has salient implications for the federal government's environmental review of the Pebble Mine permit, which is administered by the Army Corps of Engineers (the agency is currently accepting comments from the public about the Environmental Impact Statement, or EIS). Brennan noted that the fish estimation surveys done in and around the proposed mining area (and interpreted by Pebble Mine to conclude that salmon populations won't be impacted) do not capture the full story of how critical a relatively small area of water and streams are to the greater river system's productivity."You're not getting the full picture," Brennan said. What surveyors get when trying to count fish over a two or three year period, is "a snapshot in time," he explained. That "snapshot" doesn't show how productive a particular river tributary is over time, as the zone "flickers" on or off. Rather, it's an assumption that the area only produces a certain quota of fish each and every year. "We show that assumption is on pretty shaky ground," said Brennan. "Habitats and productivity of the habitats tend to fluctuate a lot." "When you cut off these little bits it might not sound like a big deal, but it can be a really big deal," said Mike Fitz, an ecologist not involved in the study who has spent years observing the salmon, bears, and wildlife in the Bristol Bay watershed, particularly those in Katmai National Park (home to the famous bear cams).  "This study really reinforces that it's hard to select different tributaries that we find unnecessary, given that they may be very important during specific years," agreed Curry Cunningham, a quantitative ecologist who monitors salmon runs in the Bristol Bay each summer.The bigger picture is clear."The study seems to definitely demonstrate that healthy runs of salmon are dependent on healthy, diverse watersheds," said Fitz. And accordingly, healthy salmon runs mean healthy, fat bears. (Though, it's unknown how, exactly, the Pebble Mine -- which would operate for 20 years -- will impact the bears and wildlife in and around the mining area. That depends on what ultimately happens to the salmon).Major shifts in salmon production.Image: Brennan et al. /  Science, 2019To gauge Bristol Bay's fluctuating  productivity, Brennan and his team caught some 1,400 salmon between 2011 and 2015 as the fish traveled up towards Bristol Bay's Nushagak River watershed -- one of the bay's largest and most productive river systems. Each fish has an oval-shaped ear bone, which form rings as it grows, similar to a tree ring. This preserves the animals' life history. The researchers used this bony data bank to measure chemical traces of an element, strontium, that naturally exists in the rivers. Critically, this element exists in different ratios in different parts of the river system -- giving the researchers insight into where these fish lived and thrived during specific years. Brennan, then, saw how different regions of the river "flickered on" with productivity, while others "flickered off.""The earstones represent a chemical record, like a GPS tracker, of each fish's life," explained Brennan.  Ear bone measurements might seem like an unusual scientific tool to assess life history. But not to a fish scientist. "[The earbones] are particularly well-suited for addressing the goals of this research," said Cunningham. The MineWell before this study came out, the Pebble Mine incited a slew of environmental headaches. Of note, the greater Bristol Bay region can boom with fish, but it can also bust; a food shortage in the ocean or disruptive weather patterns can drive fish numbers down. Accordingly, an ecologically harmful, or perhaps devastating, mine, can exacerbate the down years, and also hamper the recovery. "Why on top of [those bad years] would we want to risk really screwing this thing up?" wondered Bristol Bay resident Norm Van Vactor, president of the Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation.  "At the end of the day, do we really want to risk what is truly one of mother nature's wonders of the world for copper and gold? I don't think we do," Van Vactor told Mashable in March. A vibrant fishing industry, valued at $1.5 billion each year, is critical to the Bristol Bay region. "It's economically important, it's culturally important, it's nutritionally important," said Brennan.A mature, spawning sockeye salmon.Image: Jason Ching / University of WashingtonAnd beyond the economic bounty of the richest sockeye salmon fishery on the planet, there's an unparalleled wilderness, something that's vastly diminished in our heavily-developed society. The Lower 48's wilderness, particularly the rivers, is a shell of its former self."Basically every major river system in the U.S. is modified by humanity in a significant way," said Fitz. "Very few people alive today know what a free-flowing Colorado River is like."But in Bristol Bay, the rivers are untrammeled, and the natural world is flourishing. "Nothing really compares to the productivity we're currently experiencing in Bristol Bay," said Fitz. Consider, for example, rivers red with salmon and bears so rotund their bellies nearly scrape the ground.This productivity is now on display each summer, as the Explore.org live webcams show Katmai National Park's brown bears gobbling up bounties of fish, and growing profoundly fat. The Army Corps of Engineers will soon weigh a plethora of comments from the U.S. public about the impact of a mine in the heart of the Bristol Bay region. Aside from the public comments, the 1,400-page EIS contains a number of scientific assessments about the region's fisheries, but, according to the study's authors, doesn't responsibly account for the mine's impact to fish. A salmon fish ear bone, or otolith.Image: Sean Brennan / University of Washington"The Pebble Mine environmental impact statement, which is supposed to be a mature, state-of-the-science assessment of risks, really does a poor job of assessing risks of this specific project,"  Daniel Schindler, a professor at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and study coauthor, said in a statement.  When asked if the Army Corps of Engineers would consider this new Bristol Bay research, an agency spokesperson did not give a definitive answer, but said that "new data that is received through the course of the public comment period and made aware to the Corps is taken into consideration leading up to development the Final Environmental Impact Statement."It's likely, though, that each portion of the greater Bristol Bay watershed, however small, plays a sizable role in sustaining one of the richest, and purest, places left on Earth. Yet one open pit mine, with its 188-mile pipeline, water treatment plants, and roads is how the transformation starts. It's how it's always started."We can't keep killing watersheds with death by 1,000 cuts," said Fitz, pointing at the devastated salmon fisheries in New England and the Pacific Northwest. "What we consider normal today is a degraded environment," he said. "We just accept it because that's what we've grown up with." WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?

Antidepressants: Another Weapon Against Chronic Pain

Antidepressants: Another Weapon Against Chronic Pain Antidepressants are a staple in the treatment of many chronic pain conditions, including arthritis, nerve damage, headache, and low back pain.

In Cannes, glittery film festival literally costs the earth

In Cannes, glittery film festival literally costs the earth A fleet of energy-guzzling luxury yachts and private planes, kilos of gourmet food dumped, limousines driving stars just a few hundred metres: for environmentalists, the Cannes film festival is just "one big mess". "There is, without a doubt, a huge amount that needs to be done by the festival organisers to make it more environmentally friendly," said Cyril Dion, a filmmaker and climate activist. "During the festival, the population triples, and all of these people have to travel," said ADEN head Genevieve Huchet.

'We're In Trouble!' The Incredible True Story Of The 1969 'Snoopy' Moon Mission

'We're In Trouble!' The Incredible True Story Of The 1969 'Snoopy' Moon Mission Fifty years ago this week, 'Snoopy' and 'Charlie Brown' paved the way for the first lunar landing.

SpaceX launches first 60 satellites of its internet network

SpaceX launches first 60 satellites of its internet network SpaceX has launched a rocket carrying the first 60 satellites of its "Starlink" constellation, which is intended to provide internet from space in an array that could one day contain over 12,000 orbiting transponders. An hour later, the rocket began to release the satellites at an altitude of 280 miles (450 kilometers). The satellites then had to separate and use their thrusters to take up their positions in a relatively low orbit of 340 miles (550 kilometers).

When You Eat This Mini Robot, It Crawls Around Your Organs

When You Eat This Mini Robot, It Crawls Around Your Organs Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast/GettyDoctors have lots of ways of seeing what's going on inside your body, but none of them is really ideal. Pictures from the outside obviously don't show everything. Colonoscopes are... uncomfortable and can only reach your lower intestine. And even modern, advanced PillCams, while revolutionary, only give doctors access to a limited amount of information and have to be (ahem) retrieved and returned by the patient for reading. So researchers at the Bio-Inspired and Medical Robots Lab at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, in Israel, are building a miniature robot inspired by an inchworm that can be controlled by remote and give doctors unprecedented access to your insides.In developing their inchworm robot, engineer David Zarrouk, who runs the lab, was hoping to find a method that could improve on the access that PillCams brought to difficult-to-reach parts of the intestine. Specifically, the small intestine. According to Zarrouk: "Ten or twelve years ago a company started developing cam pills. A person can swallow it, it goes through the digestive system and takes photos from all over. This is a great idea because it allows doctors for the first time to take photos from the small intestine, which is connected to the stomach from one side and large intestine on the other side and it's very, very hard to reach."But the camera pill has drawbacks, he says. First, it takes many hours for the pill to make its way naturally through the digestive system-it has no means of propelling itself. Next, the pill can often become lodged in parts of the intestine and then slip out and slide very fast through the rest of the body, meaning it will capture fewer photos and they will be lower quality."If we can make the camera self-propelled, the doctor can be sitting near the patient moving the camera. It can happen faster and when he reaches the zone he cares about he can stop it, take more photos, and then continue. And when he doesn't care about stopping he can run quickly through," says Zarrouk. What's special and unique about the ability to control the robot this way is that a doctor will be able to use ultrasound to locate the robot inside a person's body and know exactly where it is when it spots a problematic area. With current camera pills, the location of points of interest are impossible to distinguish because everywhere inside the intestine looks the same: gray.The (A.I.) Doctor Will See You NowTo build the robot Zarrouk and his team turned to forms of motion that would work well inside flexible areas. Their main inspiration is the worm. It moves in a wavelike pattern, has the shape of a helix (like DNA), and it can be propelled from one end-meaning their robot would only need a single motor and a series of joints. They started out building it quite large to prove the concept and have been reducing it in size with every generation. The latest version of the robot is 4 cm long and 1.5 cm wide and was recently successfully tested inside a pig's intestine. "Our specific robot works better inside tube-like environments. When there's pressure on it from top and bottom it can run faster," he says. They'd like the final product to reduce in size down to about 2 cm long and 1.2 cm wide, but they're currently limited by the size of motors available on the market. To achieve this, the team is searching for a partner that has manufacturing capability and can help build a smaller motor.There are a few other aspects that also need to be worked out-the robot is currently powered by external wiring so it needs a battery and it also needs to be equipped with wireless communication (both tasks, he says, should be easily achieved with currently available technology). Eventually, Zarrouk says he'd like the robot to be able to perform more complicated tasks than simply taking pictures. For example, if a doctor reaches a point of interest, perhaps one day the robot will be able to drop a bit of medicine in a targeted location or take a small biopsy without having to perform surgery from the outside. Zarrouk says it shouldn't feel too strange to have a self-propelled, wireless, inchworm robot making its way through your intestines. "We spoke to doctors about this. The intestines are sensitive to pressure but something crawling inside it shouldn't be painful. Maybe some tickling."Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

Robot vacuums on sale this weekend: Save on Shark, iRobot, and Eufy

Robot vacuums on sale this weekend: Save on Shark, iRobot, and Eufy You have better things to spend your time doing this summer than cleaning and a robot vacuum can handle your floors with ease while you're out enjoying the weather.SEE ALSO: 7 of the best robot vacuums to tackle pet hairOr maybe you want your robot vacuum to join in your festivities -- it apparently makes beer pong more interesting:OK, likely you'll just be using the appliance for its intended purposes, so pay attention because we found deals on five robot vacuums that you'll want to take advantage of this weekend. Shark Ion RV750 -- Save $126This vacuum's self-cleaning brushroll captures short and long hair, dust, dander, and allergens throughout your home to prevent everyday buildup while dual side brushes pull in debris from corners and edges. Reviews mention that this vacuum is even tough on pet hair, which is not always the case at this price point. You are able to control and schedule the vacuum through its easy-to-use app or by Alexa and Google Assistant voice commands. The Shark Ion RV750 is a good choice that won't break the bank. Read more...More about Home, Cleaning, Vacuums, Robot Vacuums, and Mashable Shopping

China says making progress on African swine fever vaccine

China says making progress on African swine fever vaccine China will start work on clinical trials of an African swine fever vaccine, state media said on Friday, as the disease continues to spread through the world's biggest hog herd. State-owned Harbin Veterinary Research Institute has found two vaccine candidates, proven in laboratory tests to offer immunity to the disease, China National Radio said in a post on China's microblogging site Weibo. "In the next step, the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences will accelerate the progress of pilot and clinical trials, as well as vaccine production," said the report.

Tradition meets tech as Kenya's herders adapt to climate change

Tradition meets tech as Kenya's herders adapt to climate change For generations, Kaltuma Hassan's clan would study the sky over Kenya's arid north for any sign of rain -- some wind here, a wisp of cloud there -- to guide their parched livestock to water. Days on foot can reveal nothing more than bone-dry riverbeds and grazing land baked to dust, sounding the death knell for their herd. "You might go a long distance, and they die on the way... It is a very hard life," Hassan told AFP in Marsabit, a sparse and drought-prone expanse where millions of pastoral families depend entirely on livestock to survive.

Elon Musk's SpaceX launches 60 satellites for Starlink internet venture

Elon Musk's SpaceX launches 60 satellites for Starlink internet venture SpaceX, the private rocket company of high-tech entrepreneur Elon Musk, launched the first batch of 60 small satellites into low-Earth orbit on Thursday for Mr Musk's new Starlink internet service. A Falcon 9 rocket carrying the satellites blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at about 10:30 pm (0230 GMT on Friday), clearing a key hurdle for a business venture that Mr Musk hopes will generate much-needed cash for his larger ambitions in space. The launch came a week after two back-to-back countdowns for the mission were scrubbed - once due to high winds over the Cape and the next night in order to update satellite software and "triple-check" all systems. The 60 satellites flown into space were released into orbit as planned about an hour after Thursday's launch, and the Falcon 9's main-stage reusable booster rocket flew back to Earth for a successful landing on a barge floating in the Atlantic. SpaceX said it would probably take another day to learn whether all the satellites deployed were functioning properly. Each weighs about 500 pounds, making them the heaviest payload carried aloft by SpaceX to date. SpaceX tweeted this picture saying: "Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed!" They represent the initial phase of a planned constellation capable of beaming signals for high-speed internet service from space to paying customers around the globe. Mr Musk has said he sees the new Starlink venture as an important new revenue stream for his California-based Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, whose launch service income he expects to top out at around $3 billion a year. He told reporters last week that makes Starlink pivotal in helping pay for his larger goals of developing a new spacecraft to fly paying customers to the moon and for eventually trying to colonise Mars. "We think this is a key stepping stone on the way towards establishing a self-sustaining city on Mars and a base on the moon," said billionaire Musk, who is also chief executive officer of automaker Tesla. Some of the 60 satellites launched from the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket Credit: @SpaceX At least 12 launches carrying similar payloads are needed to achieve constant internet coverage of most of the world, Mr Musk said. For now, Starlink is only authorised for US operations. Mr Musk faces stiff competition. Airbus SE-backed OneWeb launched its own clutch of satellites in February, while LeoSat Enterprises and Canada's Telesat are also working to build data networks. In each network, the tiny satellites orbit closer to Earth than traditional communications satellites, a technological shift made possible by advances in laser technology and computer chips. Mr Musk said SpaceX would begin approaching customers later this year or next year. As many as 2,000 satellites will be launched per year, with the ultimate objective of placing up to 12,000 into orbit.

SpaceX launches first satellites of its internet network

SpaceX launches first satellites of its internet network SpaceX on Thursday launched a rocket containing the first 60 satellites of its "Starlink" constellation, which is intended to provide internet from space and could one day number 12,000 satellites. The second stage of the rocket will begin to release them one hour after launch, at an altitude of 270 miles (440 kilometers), and then the satellites will use their thrusters to take up their places in a relatively low orbit of 340 miles (550 kilometers).

NASA executive quits weeks after appointment to lead 2024 moon landing plan

NASA executive quits weeks after appointment to lead 2024 moon landing plan Mark Sirangelo, named six weeks ago as special assistant to NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, left the agency as NASA abandoned a reorganization plan due to a chilly reception on Capitol Hill, Bridenstine said in a statement. Two individuals close to the space program and familiar with the situation said Sirangelo was escorted out of NASA's headquarters in Washington on Wednesday after his resignation.

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