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Could President Trump be impeached and removed from office - but still reelected?

Could President Trump be impeached and removed from office - but still reelected? What happens when a presidential impeachment inquiry runs into a presidential election year? The United States in uncharted territory.

Venezuela ex-intel chief missing in Spain ahead of US extradition: police

Venezuela ex-intel chief missing in Spain ahead of US extradition: police Venezuela's former military intelligence chief has gone missing in Spain just days after a court approved a request for his extradition to the United States on drug trafficking charges, police said Wednesday. "They are currently looking for him," said a spokeswoman for Spain's national police, referring to General Hugo Armando Carvajal. Judicial sources said police had gone to his house in Madrid after Friday's court decision but could not find him.

Damaged Hard Rock hotel will be completely demolished, New Orleans officials say

Damaged Hard Rock hotel will be completely demolished, New Orleans officials say The demolition process will take nine weeks, followed by three months of cleanup. The building's owners will cover all costs.

An Air India flight was delayed nearly 12 hours after a stowaway rat was spotted in the cabin

An Air India flight was delayed nearly 12 hours after a stowaway rat was spotted in the cabin "The rat was located and trapped. Then the aircraft was fumigated," a representative from Air India said, according to Indian local media.

Bolivian senator declares herself president in Evo Morales' absence

Bolivian senator declares herself president in Evo Morales' absence Bolivian opposition senator Jeanine Anez has declared herself interim president after Evo Morales resigned from office before fleeing to Mexico.Bolivia has been plunged into a state of crisis after Morales, who was first elected in 2006, was forced to stand down following weeks of protests and violence over a disputed presidential election result.

Poland seizes two for plotting Breivik-style attacks on Muslims

Poland seizes two for plotting Breivik-style attacks on Muslims Polish agents arrested two people accused of planning attacks against Muslims inspired by Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik and suspected white supremacist Brenton Tarrant in New Zealand, the security service said on Wednesday. The arrests follow a spate of attacks involving white supremacists targeting ethnic and religious minorities across the globe. Far-right groups have grown in strength in Poland, the largest of the European Union's post-communist states.

2020 Subaru Outback vs. 2019 Honda Passport in Photos

2020 Subaru Outback vs. 2019 Honda Passport in Photos

William Taylor laughs at GOP question if Giuliani channel was 'as outlandish as it could be'

William Taylor laughs at GOP question if Giuliani channel was 'as outlandish as it could be' Republican counsel Steve Castor came to Wednesday's impeachment hearing with a curious line of questioning: could something extremely unusual have, theoretically, been even more unusual?Castor, the lawyer who questioned diplomat William Taylor on behalf of House Republicans during the public impeachment hearing, asked about what Taylor had previously described as a "confusing and unusual arrangement for making U.S. policy toward Ukraine" in the Trump administration, with there being a secondary, "highly irregular" channel including Rudy Giuliani operating outside of formal diplomatic processes.But Castor's apparent defense of this irregular channel is that it could have, in theory, been more irregular."In fairness, this irregular channel of diplomacy, it's not as outlandish as it could be," Castor said to Taylor. "Is that correct?"Taylor laughed at this question while agreeing that, well, sure, it "could be" more outlandish. But the line of questioning didn't go quite as Castor likely planned. After Castor tried to get Taylor to say that U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland's involvement in the secondary channel also was "certainly not outlandish," Taylor didn't exactly agree, responding that it's "a little unusual for the U.S. ambassador to the EU to play a role in Ukraine policy.""Okay," Castor said, making one more attempt by asking, "It might be irregular, but it's certainly not outlandish." This time, a seemingly baffled but amused Taylor just smiled. > "This irregular channel of diplomacy is not as outlandish as it could be, is that correct?" GOP counsel asks William Taylor. > > Taylor agrees, but adds, "It's a little unusual for the US ambassador to EU to play a role in Ukraine policy." https://t.co/YHsiIaIXhs pic.twitter.com/Vp6mO6PhvF> > -- ABC News (@ABC) November 13, 2019More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird?

Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops A federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment. Tuesday's ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry. ACLU attorney Esha Bhandari said the ruling strengthens the Fourth Amendment protections of international travelers who enter the United States every year.

Feud Between Trump Advisers Underscores a White House Torn by Rivalries

Feud Between Trump Advisers Underscores a White House Torn by Rivalries WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump's chief of staff and former national security adviser clashed in court Monday. Two new books describe how top aides to the president secretly plotted to circumvent him. And nearly every day brings more testimony about the deep internal schism over the president's effort to pressure Ukraine for domestic political help.In the three years since his election, Trump has never been accused of running a cohesive, unified team. But the revelations of recent days have put on display perhaps more starkly than ever the fissures tearing at his administration. In the emerging picture, the Trump White House is a toxic stew of personality disputes, policy differences, political rivalries, ethical debates and a fundamental rift over the president himself.The fault lines were most clearly evident Monday when Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, abruptly withdrew his effort to join a lawsuit over impeachment testimony after a sharp collision with his onetime colleague John Bolton, the former national security adviser. Mulvaney retreated only hours after a lawyer for Bolton and his former deputy, Charles Kupperman, went to court arguing that his clients wanted nothing to do with the staff chief because they had vastly different interests.In withdrawing his motion, Mulvaney indicated that he would now press his own lawsuit to determine whether to comply with a subpoena to testify in the House impeachment inquiry. But it left him at odds with the president, who has ordered his team not to cooperate with the House, an order Mulvaney essentially has refused to accept as other administration officials have until he receives separate guidance from a judge.Mulvaney's lawyers emphasized that he was not trying to oppose Trump, maintaining that he was actually trying to sue House Democrats, and an administration official who insisted on anonymity said there was "no distance" between the president and his chief of staff. Still, Mulvaney hired his own lawyer instead of relying on the White House counsel, and he consciously made clear that he was open to testifying if left to his own devices.The situation underscored long-standing enmity between Mulvaney and the counsel, Pat Cipollone, who have repeatedly been at odds throughout the impeachment inquiry, according to four administration officials briefed on the events.Mulvaney, who has been left with an "acting" title for more than 10 months and therefore insecure in his position, is said to see Cipollone as angling for his job as chief of staff. People close to Cipollone deny that and say he is not interested, although they acknowledged that there were previous discussions with Trump about such a shift.Hoping to bolster his own place in the White House, Mulvaney has recommended to Trump that he hire Mark Paoletta, the general counsel at the Office of Management and Budget, where Mulvaney is still technically the director, according to people familiar with the maneuvering. Paoletta would not displace Cipollone but would give Mulvaney an ally on the legal team as the impeachment battle plays out.Another person familiar with the latest moves said that Paoletta was considered but that West Wing officials decided they were pleased with the hiring of Pam Bondi, a former attorney general of Florida, and Tony Sayegh, a Republican strategist, both of whom began full time this week.The latest personnel struggle echoed an attempt by Mulvaney several weeks ago to hire former Rep. Trey Gowdy, a fellow South Carolina Republican, to join the president's legal team. Cipollone and others were said to take issue with the idea, concerned it was an effort by Mulvaney to run his own legal team. Cipollone told allies he had no such concerns, but eventually, Gowdy bowed out, facing an issue with a ban on former House members lobbying Congress.Despite his own tenuous job status, Mulvaney has privately told associates in recent days that there is no easy way for Trump to fire him in the midst of the impeachment fight, the implication being that he knows too much about the president's pressure campaign to force Ukraine to provide incriminating information about Democrats.The court fight between Mulvaney and Bolton on Monday brought their long-running feud into the open. Mulvaney was among those facilitating the Ukraine effort while Bolton was among those objecting to it. At one point, according to testimony in the impeachment inquiry, Bolton declared that he wanted no part of the "drug deal" Mulvaney was cooking up, as the then national security adviser characterized the pressure campaign.Their clash was just one of many inside Trump's circle spilling out into public in recent days. The legal conflict Monday came just a day before Nikki Haley, the president's former ambassador to the United Nations, plans to publish a memoir accusing Trump's former secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, and former chief of staff, John Kelly, of conspiring behind his back while in office. Her account in effect is a mirror image of another book coming out this month by an anonymous senior administration official describing how concerned aides mounted their own internal resistance to Trump.Kelly disputed Haley in a statement Sunday and Tillerson added his own refutation Monday. "During my service to our country as the secretary of state, at no time did I, nor to my direct knowledge did anyone else serving along with me, take any actions to undermine the president," Tillerson said in a statement.While he offered Trump frank advice, he said, once the president made a decision, he did his best to carry it out. "Ambassador Haley was rarely a participant in my many meetings and is not in a position to know what I may or may not have said to the president," Tillerson added.Tillerson was never enamored of Haley when they were both in office, seeing her as a rival trying to upstage him and run foreign policy from her perch at the United Nations. Haley's portrayal of herself fighting off Trump's internal enemies was met Monday with scoffs from several administration officials, who said they were aware of little evidence to back up her self-description. But a former senior administration official who witnessed some of the interactions Haley had with the president described her as heavily involved with policy.The books are being published at the same time new transcripts are released by the House documenting how Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, and a coterie of allies, including Mulvaney, sought to sideline career diplomats and other foreign policy officials who warned against enlisting Ukraine to help the president's personal political interests.The dispute pitted one part of Trump's administration against another in a struggle over foreign policy that now has the president on the precipice of being impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors.The lawsuit that Mulvaney sought to join was filed by Kupperman, a longtime associate of Bolton, and asked a court to decide whether Kupperman should obey the president's dictate to stay silent or a House subpoena to testify.While not technically a party to the lawsuit, Bolton, who left his post in September after clashing with Trump, is represented by the same lawyer, Charles Cooper, and is taking the same position as Kupperman in waiting for the court to decide whether he should testify or not.Mulvaney's effort to join the lawsuit late Friday night stunned many involved in the impeachment debate because he still works for the president. Mulvaney did not ask Bolton or Kupperman for permission to join the lawsuit nor did he give them a heads up. Bolton and his team considered it an outrageous move since they were on opposite sides of the Ukraine fight and did not want their lawsuit polluted with Mulvaney.Not only did the motion filed Monday by Bolton's camp seek to keep Mulvaney out of the lawsuit, it even advanced an argument that the acting chief of staff may have to testify before House impeachment investigators. The motion noted that in a briefing with reporters last month, Mulvaney appeared "to admit that there was a quid pro quo" before later trying to take back the admission, meaning that he might not have the right to defy a House subpoena since he had already discussed the matter in public."Accordingly, there is a serious question as to whether Mulvaney waived the absolute testimonial immunity claimed by the president," the motion said.Mulvaney's lawyers rejected that. "The idea that Mr. Mulvaney has somehow waived broad immunity by speaking about this" at a briefing "doesn't have any legs," Christopher Muha, one of the lawyers, told the judge in the case Monday afternoon, according to a transcript of a conference call released by the court.Nonetheless, Judge Richard Leon, of the U.S. District for the District of Columbia, indicated at the end of the call that he was inclined to reject Mulvaney's request to join the suit. Mulvaney then withdrew it and said he would file his own separate action.The motion filed by Bolton's camp noted that Kupperman does not take a position on who is right, the president or Congress, and "will remain neutral on the merits of the constitutional issue," while Mulvaney "has made it clear that he supports the executive" branch interpretation.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company

The U.S. Navy canceled a routine Black Sea operation after Trump complained that it was hostile to Russia

The U.S. Navy canceled a routine Black Sea operation after Trump complained that it was hostile to Russia Christopher Anderson, an aide to Kurt Volker, former special envoy to Ukraine, testified that the White House canceled a Navy freedom-of-navigation operation in the Black Sea after President Trump complained to then-national security adviser John Bolton about a CNN report that framed the operation as a counter to Russia, Politico reported.

Climate change is damaging the health of the world's children and threatens lifelong impact, report says

Climate change is damaging the health of the world's children and threatens lifelong impact, report says Climate change is already damaging children's health worldwide and could shape the well-being of an entire generation.

Delhi smog hits 'emergency' levels as Britain's Prince Charles visits

Delhi smog hits 'emergency' levels as Britain's Prince Charles visits New Delhi has been choked on and off for weeks, as industrial and traffic pollution -- combined with smoke from crop stubble burning -- cast a toxic pall over the metropolis. With the government facing new criticism over steps taken to counter the pollution, Prince Charles visited the Indian Meteorology Department as part of his two-day visit to India.

'Words matter': Trump accused of fuelling attacks on Hispanics as violent hate crimes hit 16-year high

'Words matter': Trump accused of fuelling attacks on Hispanics as violent hate crimes hit 16-year high Violent hate crimes have climbed to a 16-year year high in the US, with a surge in attacks on Hispanics, according to FBI data.Reports of hate crimes dipped slightly in 2018 from an alarming increase the previous year, but violence rose as attacks increasingly targeting people instead of property.

In Republican lawmaker's impeachment tweets, a hidden message?

In Republican lawmaker's impeachment tweets, a hidden message? The first letters of 23 of the Arizona Republican's tweets spell out "EPSTEIN DIDNT KILL HIMSELF" - a reference that many observers aren't willing to dismiss as a coincidence. The morbid acrostic, coincidental or not, reflects a repeated conspiracy theory-turned-meme over the death of the financier Jeffrey Epstein. Epstein was found dead in his jail cell in August, and a subsequent autopsy ruled his death a suicide.

Korean survivor says Japan's no-show at 'comfort women' case in Seoul lacks honor

Korean survivor says Japan's no-show at 'comfort women' case in Seoul lacks honor A South Korean woman who had been forced to work in a Japanese wartime military brothel said Japan lacked honor for failing to attend a South Korean court on Wednesday as it began hearing a civil case brought against its government by a group of victims. "I am a living proof of history," said Lee Yong-soo, the 91-year-old survivor, her voice quaking with emotion as she addressed a news conference held near the courthouse, before proceedings began. Reminders of Japan's 1910-45 colonization of the Korean peninsula are inflammatory for both sides.

The Latest: Officer says Miranda failure was a mistake

The Latest: Officer says Miranda failure was a mistake A police officer who obtained a confession from the suspect in the disappearance and death of University of Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts says she made an honest mistake by initially failing to read him his legal rights. Officer Pamela Romero testified Wednesday that she tried to read Cristhian Bahena Rivera his Miranda warnings from memory during the Aug. 20, 2018, interrogation. After several more hours of questioning, Rivera led police officers to a cornfield where they discovered Tibbetts' body underneath a stack of leaves and stalks.

Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them)

Why China Loves Russia's Su-35 Fighter (And Might Buy Even More of Them) But a larger question looms.

Trump Heads to Supreme Court for Second Time Over Tax Records

Trump Heads to Supreme Court for Second Time Over Tax Records (Bloomberg) -- For the second time in less than a week President Donald Trump said he'll go to the U.S. Supreme Court to appeal court rulings threatening to expose his tax records.An 11-judge panel of the appeals court in Washington on Wednesday rejected the president's request that it reconsider a ruling refusing to quash a demand by House Democrats for records from Trump's accountants at Mazars USA LLP. Three of the judges said they would agree to the hearing."In light of the well-reasoned dissent, we will seek review at the Supreme Court," Trump's lawyer Jay Sekulow said in a statement.Congress issued the subpoena to Mazars in April as part of an investigation of whether to change ethics-in-government laws. Trump sued to block it, saying the House Oversight and Reform Committee had no legitimate legislative reason to seek his records. Trump's last recourse now is to go to the U.S. Supreme Court.In a 2-1 decision in October, the appeals court panel called the House subpoena "a valid exercise of the legislative oversight authority because it seeks information important to determining the fitness of legislation to address potential problems within the Executive Branch and the electoral system."Last week Trump's lawyers told a judge they'll ask the Supreme Court to block a subpoena from the Manhattan district attorney seeking his tax filings and other financial records in a grand jury investigation. They're due to file their request for consideration at the top court Thursday.The federal appeals court in New York rejected Trump's claim that he has broad immunity from criminal investigation. The panel ruled 3-0 that Trump can't block the subpoena.Read More: Trump Records Must Be Given to the House, Appeals Court Says\--With assistance from Jordan Fabian.To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Harris in federal court in Washington at aharris16@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Joe Schneider, Peter BlumbergFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

2020 Toyota Camry, 2021 Toyota Avalon Adding All-Wheel Drive

2020 Toyota Camry, 2021 Toyota Avalon Adding All-Wheel Drive Too bad Toyota isn't resurrecting the All-Trac name from the 1980s for the new AWD models.

Israeli airstrike kills Islamic Jihad commander in Gaza home

Israeli airstrike kills Islamic Jihad commander in Gaza home The Israeli strike killed Bahaa Abu el-Atta and his wife, setting off a furious barrage of dozens of rocket attacks reaching as far as Tel Aviv.

The US is being hit by a frigid, early cold snap that has killed at least 6 people and could break 100 temperature records

The US is being hit by a frigid, early cold snap that has killed at least 6 people and could break 100 temperature records The National Weather Service said the unseasonal cold air, which spread from Kansas to Minnesota to Kentucky to New York, has brought an early winter.

Steve Bannon says Democrats' strategy to impeach Trump is 'brilliant'

Steve Bannon says Democrats' strategy to impeach Trump is 'brilliant' Far-right political strategist Steve Bannon has called the tactics deployed by Democrats to impeach his former boss and remove him from office "quite brilliant."

Montgomery's first African-American mayor hopes MLK is "proud"

Montgomery's first African-American mayor hopes MLK is "Protesting and change has always, I think, been in the DNA of people" in Montgomery, known as the "Cradle of the Confederacy," Reed said

Michael Avenatti faces new fraud charge in Nike extortion case

Michael Avenatti faces new fraud charge in Nike extortion case Federal prosecutors on Wednesday unveiled a new fraud charge against lawyer Michael Avenatti, accusing him of lying to a client as part of his alleged effort to extort Nike Inc. The prosecutors also dropped two counts of conspiracy against Avenatti from the case, which was first made public in March, according to a superseding indictment filed in federal court in Manhattan. "I am extremely pleased that the two counts alleging I engaged in a conspiracy against Nike have just been dismissed by Trump's DOJ," Avenatti wrote on Twitter, referring to the U.S. Department of Justice under President Donald Trump.

Study: Half Europe's unauthorized migrants in Germany, UK

Study: Half Europe's unauthorized migrants in Germany, UK At least 3.9 million unauthorized migrants - and possibly as many as 4.8 million - lived in Europe in 2017 with half of them in Germany and the United Kingdom, according to a study published Wednesday. The Pew Research Center said the number grew from 2014, when about 3-3.7 million resided in Europe, and peaked in 2015-16 during the refugee crisis when some 1.3 million people arrived, mostly from war-torn countries such as Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. Also, the European Union and Turkey signed a deal designed to keep millions of migrants in Turkey from coming to Europe, and many asylum seekers, especially Syrians, received asylum or residency rights in Germany and other European countries.

China's Submarines Can Now Launch a Nuclear War Against America

China's Submarines Can Now Launch a Nuclear War Against America A missile test last November made the point quite clear.

Mysterious Professor at Heart of Russian Investigation Returns for Impeachment Proceedings

Mysterious Professor at Heart of Russian Investigation Returns for Impeachment Proceedings Chip Somodevilla/GettyROME-Joseph Mifsud, the erstwhile professor from Malta whose promise to help then-candidate Donald Trump's campaign aide George Papadopoulos get his hands on Russian "dirt" about Hillary Clinton has reportedly resurfaced. On Wednesday, the Italian newspaper Corriere Della Sera posted a six-minute audio recording in English it says Mifsud sent from an anonymous email account late Tuesday night. A short time later, the Italian news agency Adnkronos published a clip it received. Whether other publications received the Mifsud missive is not clear, nor is the more important question of whether it's genuine. Last summer Attorney General William Barr and U.S. Attorney John Durham traveled to Rome twice to learn what they could from Italian secret service officials about the professor as part of their investigation into the Russian investigation led by Robert Mueller. Mifsud has not been seen for two years and speculation has swirled around the question of whether he is still alive and, if he is, who is supporting him.Barr Went to Rome to Hear a Secret Tape From Joseph Mifsud, the Professor Who Helped Ignite the Russia ProbeThe Corriere clip starts with a brief introduction. "Today is the 11th of November 2019" and continues, "I am Joseph Mifsud speaking, this is my voice." It does sound like other recordings of Mifsud.He goes on to say that he has had "no contact with friends and family for a number of months now." While he doesn't say where he is or where he has been, it is clear that-if this is Mifsud-he hopes that he can come back out from under whatever rock he has been hiding under for the last two years. "It is extremely important finally ... that I am given the possibility of coming back to life," the voice says. "It has been very, very difficult for me to live like this, without any human contact, without a human experience, and I believe that I should be given the opportunity to do that. It is extremely important that somebody somewhere decides to let me breathe again."He does not say who is keeping him from resurfacing or why he has chosen to go underground. But he does make a laborious attempt to explain that he is "just a networker" who connects people who might be interested in "similar topics.""It's been almost two years to date that the whole issue-blown up issue-has been presented to the world's media and on the world's stage, as if I had something to do with issues concerning countries," the man says, without naming which countries or issues those are. He then goes on to deny infiltrating "programs, contacts or any other institutions of the world."The Mifsud voice does not mention that he has been accused of being a Russian asset in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. Nor does me mention Papadopoulos, who pleaded guilty to lying to the F.B.I. about their interactions. Nor does the man who says he is Mifsud say he has also been accused by deep state conspiracy theorists that he was sent as a lure to trap Trump by then-President Barack Obama. Instead, he calls all accusations that he is anything but an academic absurd.  "I try to bring one group in contact with another," he said. "Not, not repeat and underline, nobody in any service, secret service, intelligence service or anybody of this sort." He then goes on to qualify that if he had met any such spooks, he didn't know it. "If I had any contact with this, I have not known that this person or that person had any link with any institution," the man claiming to be Mifsud says. Mifsud's own lawyer, Stephan Roh, has insinuated that his client was forced into hiding by Italian intelligence officials to avoid compromising the investigation into Mueller's investigation. "I think Mifsud is still alive, he was at least until last Spring. I know he was hiding because he feared for his life, I also know that someone forced him to hide," Roh told Italian news agency Adnkronos last year. "Mifsud had to disappear, because he could compromise the whole investigation of Mueller against Trump."Here's How Dumb Bill Barr's Great Mifsud Conspiracy Story Really IsThe person on tape doesn't necessarily seem to agree with that assessment. Instead, he says he was not the bearer of dirt on anyone to anyone. "It was never my intent to try to obtain any information to pass from one side to the other," the voice says. "I have never done so because II was never in possession with any information which would be useful to one side or another."The Adnkronos clip rambles, with the man purporting to be Mifsud seemingly trying to convince whoever is listening that he wants out of hiding. "I have kept out of the limelight. I have tried to keep myself busy-mentally. I'm going to be 60 in April ... I need to have contacts with my ailing parents ... I've been living a very lonely life."He goes on to say, "I have never been paid by anybody to commit any intrusion into the privacy of another," he says. As noted, there is no independent verification of the recording's validity. One might think a video would be far more convincing.BuzzFeed quotes the investigative journalism website Belingcat's analysis that it is likely Mifsud based on words Mifsud is known to mispronounce, and the site called his former girlfriend who told it she was "certain" it was her former lover.  Adnkronos, on the other hand, sent the audio tape to Mfisud's Swiss lawyer Stephan Roh, who says it is not him. If the voice does indeed belong to the mysterious professor, or even if it does not, it begs the question why the name Mifsud would resurface on the eve of the open impeachment hearings into Trump over the Ukraine? His broad denials prove nothing. His adamant insistence that he has "been a networker all my life" proves even less. Still, the timing is suspicious and mysterious. Who benefits? Until we know more, impossible to tell.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

Republicans gripe about acting secretaries - and pave the way for another

Republicans gripe about acting secretaries - and pave the way for another The Senate confirmed Chad Wolf Wednesday to become policy undersecretary at the Department of Homeland Security so that he can take another job - acting secretary of the entire agency. The strange maneuver comes as the White House still hasn't named a permanent successor to Kirstjen Nielsen to lead DHS since her resignation in April. In a 54-41 vote, the Senate approved Wolf's nomination, with Democratic Sens.

'Blossom everywhere': Hong Kong protesters evolve tactics

'Blossom everywhere': Hong Kong protesters evolve tactics From "be water" to "blossom everywhere", Hong Kong's black-clad pro-democracy protesters' tactics have evolved this week in their bid to overwhelm police by creating flashpoints in as many areas as possible. The campaign of massive disruption has seen small groups of protesters emerge all across the city of 7.5 million people from Monday to block intersections, vandalise shops, clash with police and damage the vital train network. "We must blossom everywhere to divert the police force," read an anonymous post on Wednesday morning on an internet message board popular with protesters, echoing other calls online.

Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia comments

Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers sent a letter to Hillary Clinton demanding she retract Russia comments Tulsi Gabbard's lawyers want Hillary Clinton to make her retraction at a press conference and on social media.

Warren Says Big Business Shouldn't Worry About Her Presidency

Warren Says Big Business Shouldn't Worry About Her Presidency (Bloomberg) -- Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren sought to reassure business leaders and investors they have nothing to worry about if she is elected president -- as long as they obey the law."I believe in markets. Markets with rules that are consistently enforced," she said in an interview in Concord, New Hampshire. "If someone has built a business on cheating people, then they should be very worried about a Warren administration, but if that's not the case, then there's no reason for them to worry."Warren's progressive proposals for reducing inequality, including a wealth tax, breaking up big technology and agriculture companies, as well as her $21 trillion plan to replace private health insurance with a government-run system, have raised concerns on Wall Street that her policies would be ruinous and push the U.S. too far to the left.As she has gained in the polls, she's come in for criticism from Wall Street executives and billionaires, including JPMorgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon, hedge fund billionaire Leon Cooperman and Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates.She attacked Cooperman in a new campaign commercial, and on Wednesday he fired back in a profanity-laced tirade on CNBCThe Massachusetts senator, who has pledged not to take big-donor money to fuel her campaign, said the criticism from Wall Street reminded her of the opposition she faced when she proposed establishing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau after the financial crisis."A lot of financial institutions were saying in effect, 'if there's a cop on the beat, that's going to destroy my business,'" Warren said. "My answer was: 'Really? What are you doing that a cop is going to catch you out and make you shut down? Do you not have a business model that works and the cop could glance over your shoulder once in a while and say yeah, that's fine.'"Warren is gaining on front-runner Joe Biden in polls with a campaign message that corporate and government wrongdoing have broken American democracy. She's presented plans to tackle corruption, including increasing oversight of lobbying and imposing restrictions and large fines on some of the largest U.S. corporations."If you're running a straight-up honest business, you want a cop on the beat, because you don't want to have to compete against the cheaters," Warren said. "That's what a Warren administration will be all about."She has vowed to make the richest Americans bear the cost of her plans through higher taxes, including levies on wealth and financial transactions. In a research note this month, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. said her plan to return the corporate tax rate to 26% from 18% would drive down earnings for S&P 500 companies.On the campaign trail, Warren tells potential voters that while she doesn't have a "beef with billionaires," she wants to ensure that they pay their fare share.To contact the reporter on this story: Misyrlena Egkolfopoulou in Washington at megkolfopoul@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel

See Photos of the 2020 Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel

Federal prosecutors to charge 2 more St. Louis officers

Federal prosecutors to charge 2 more St. Louis officers Federal prosecutors will seek additional charges in the 2017 attack of an undercover St. Louis police officer who claimed he was beaten "like Rodney King" by his own colleagues. St. Louis officers Randy Hays, 32, and Bailey Colletta, 26, have pleaded guilty in connection with the attack of undercover Officer Luther Hall. Two others, Dustin Boone, 36, and Christopher Myers, 28, are awaiting trial.

Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurt

Italian ship attacked by pirates in Mexico, two crew hurt Pirates attacked an Italy-flagged offshore supply vessel in the southern Gulf of Mexico, injuring two crew members, the Mexican Navy said on Tuesday, in the latest outbreak of robbery and piracy to hit oil platforms and infrastructure in the area. Owned by Italian offshore contractor Micoperi, the boat is a supply vessel for Mexico's oil industry. Micoperi and the Italian embassy in Mexico did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

A History of Modern American Architecture

A History of Modern American Architecture

Socialism Stinks: The Unfortunate Lessons of Venezuela's Central Planning

Socialism Stinks: The Unfortunate Lessons of Venezuela's Central Planning Socialism doesn't work.

Investigators found uranium particles at a secret facility in Iran, suggesting a further rejection of the nuclear deal

Investigators found uranium particles at a secret facility in Iran, suggesting a further rejection of the nuclear deal The International Atomic Energy Agency said uranium particles had been discovered at a facility not previously declared by Iranian authorities.

German air force rejects delivery of two Airbus planes

German air force rejects delivery of two Airbus planes Germany's air force said Wednesday it had refused delivery of two Airbus A400M transport planes over technical faults, saying bolts holding the propellers on some already operational aircraft were loose. Repeated technical problems have dogged the A400M programme, a turboprop transport aircraft developed jointly for Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Spain and Turkey.

From 'Anonymous,' key excerpts from inside Trump White House on Putin, Hillary

From 'Anonymous,' key excerpts from inside Trump White House on Putin, Hillary Key excerpts from "A Warning," a book by an anonymous senior administration official about President Trump and his administration.

'Watchmen' brings 1921 Tulsa massacre to the fore: Three questions

'Watchmen' brings 1921 Tulsa massacre to the fore: Three questions The massacre in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was largely forgotten, even by those living in the state. But as many as 300 black people died.

WSU fraternity death marks 4th campus fatality in a month

WSU fraternity death marks 4th campus fatality in a month "There is a cultural problem," said Franklin College Professor Hank Nuwer, who has studied fraternity drinking trends for decades

Report: Loud fight with detective preceded chief's death

Report: Loud fight with detective preceded chief's death A maintenance man checking on a noise complaint at a Florida beachfront hotel Sunday night walked into the room where a small-town Oklahoma police detective killed his boss in a drunken brawl, authorities said. The noises coming from room 527 at the Hilton on Pensacola Beach on Sunday night were so loud that the couple staying next door asked to switch rooms, according to an arrest report released to The Associated Press on Tuesday. Miller was later pronounced dead.

Despite Kashmir anger, China's Xi invites India's Modi to visit again next year

Despite Kashmir anger, China's Xi invites India's Modi to visit again next year Chinese President Xi Jinping has invited Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to visit China again next year after two informal summits between the men in each other's countries, despite deep disagreement over the disputed Kashmir region. Xi and Modi met in southern India last month, following their first informal summit in China last year as the two sought to put their often deeply strained relationship back on track.

Cows swept off island during Hurricane Dorian found after swimming for miles

Cows swept off island during Hurricane Dorian found after swimming for miles Cows missing for two months were located on North Carolina's Outer Banks after 'mini tsunami' carried wildlife awayCows are recognized as adept swimmers comfortable with covering a few hundred yards - but swimming miles of open water in a hurricane is outside their general range. Photograph: Dawn Damico/AlamyThree cows swept off an island during the raging storm of Hurricane Dorian have been located on North Carolina's Outer Banks after apparently swimming four miles during the storm.The extraordinary swimming bovines were grazing on their home of Cedar Island when the giant storm hit on 6 September, generating an 8ft "mini tsunami" that swept away wildlife, including 28 wild horses and about 17 cows from the island's herd.They were presumed dead, but Cape Lookout National Seashore staff spotted one of the cows on another barrier island a month after the storm. That sighting was followed by two more, apparently grazing peaceably. A picture of the rangy-looking trio is now on Facebook.Cows are recognized as adept swimmers comfortable with covering a few hundred yards. But swimming miles of open water in a hurricane is outside their general range of expertise.Cape Lookout Park spokesman BG Horvat said the animals were lucky not to have been swept out into the Atlantic."I'll say it's about four miles across Core Sound," Horvat told McClatchy news service. "Remember, the cows and all the horses were swept away with the water surging back. Who knows exactly, but the cows certainly have a gripping story to share."Locals are now working on a plan to recover the animals - presumably without making them swim.

Kentucky's GOP governor embraces conspiracies as he refuses to concede

Kentucky's GOP governor embraces conspiracies as he refuses to concede Only hours after he appeared to lose his reelection bid last week, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, started making baseless claims about supposed irregularities and voter fraud.

MSNBC's Malcolm Nance: Trump Was on the Russians' Radar as 'Early as 1977'

MSNBC's Malcolm Nance: Trump Was on the Russians' Radar as 'Early as 1977' MSNBC analyst Malcolm Nance, long one of the network's loudest voices when it comes to pushing Russiagate conspiracies, claimed Tuesday morning that President Donald Trump is a Russian asset who was on the Russians' radar "as early as 1977" via his first marriage to Czech-born Ivana Trump.Nance appeared on MSNBC's Morning Joe, in a segment first spotted by Mediaite, to hawk his latest Trump-centric Russia book and was immediately congratulated by host Willie Geist for being "out front before most people" were aware of the Kremlin's attempts to interfere in the 2016 election.Nance, a retired naval intelligence operator, went on to boast that he saw early in Trump's presidential campaign that the U.S. was under attack by a "wide-ranging information warfare attack" by Russia that was designed to make Trump president, adding that he saw it "about a year before anyone would really understand that."Pointing to Russia's hack of the DNC servers, Nance said that "Russia was trying to do Watergate" and that this "set off a chain of activities in my brain" based on previous Cold War activities from the then-Soviet Union that made it clear that this was an attack on the United States.Having established that he was aware that Russia was looking to interfere in the election at an early stage, Nance then dove headfirst into conspiratorial waters about Trump.Citing reporting by The Guardian, Nance said there were indicators that Trump had been "under Russian intelligence surveillance for a very long time-as early as 1977 with his first wife, Ivana." Noting that Ivana was from Czechoslovakia, then part of the Eastern Bloc, Nance claimed that the country's intelligence community at the time was monitoring her and thus gained access to Trump's communications.From there, the cable news pundit asserted that "Russia became very interested" in Trump during the mid-'80s as he first considered building a Trump Tower Moscow and began tossing around the idea of a presidential run."They had ten years of collection and then they brought him to Moscow for what he wanted, which is Trump Tower," Nance added. "But from that moment on, an enormous dossier of information was collected on him and more importantly, how to exploit him and his simple exploit-as we call it in the intelligence community-and he is avaricious to a fault. He wants money, they now own him. Modern Russia, with a former KGB director as president, they know how to exploit people, they know how to manipulate people, and they know how to buy people."Geist, meanwhile, suggested he bought what Nance was selling, remarking that "Putin and Russia never could have dreamed in the 1980s" that when they looked at Trump as an asset that he'd eventually be president. The host would go on to ask Nance when the Russians then decided to start using that information to make sure Trump was elected.According to Nance, "supervillain" Putin "took all the files of everyone he had ever flipped" during his Soviet days and "brought that into the business world when it became modern Russia," claiming it was around 2014 they decided to move Trump from "useful idiot" to an "unwitting asset, where he's being used and he doesn't know it.""And then by 2014, it's pretty clear that he knows it when they back Trump Tower Moscow 2.0, and then they put a set of rose-colored glasses on his face," Nance concluded. "Donald Trump sees the world only through Moscow's point of view because he knows that is where an enormous quantity of money that he cannot access exists and will be made available to him. Is the next step a Russian asset, where he is aware of those activities? Robert Mueller said yes. That he was well aware that he was going to benefit from Russia."Editor's note: An earlier version of this story mischaracterized Nance's comment. It has been updated to reflect that Nance said Trump was under Russian surveillance as early as 1977. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

A Chinese Navy with 10 Aircraft Carriers? It Could Happen.

A Chinese Navy with 10 Aircraft Carriers? It Could Happen. It could be the reality by 2049

Former Bolivia president Evo Morales flees to Mexico as country descends into chaos

Former Bolivia president Evo Morales flees to Mexico as country descends into chaos Former Bolivian president Evo Morales has flown to Mexico after fleeing his South American homeland which has descended into chaos following an allegedly rigged election.

4 frat deaths this month. 2 this week alone. What's going on with fraternity hazing?

4 frat deaths this month. 2 this week alone. What's going on with fraternity hazing? As a wave of young men nationally die in circumstances that appear to be related to fraternities, experts are unsure what to do next

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